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Open AccessArticle

Standards for Deriving Nonhuman Primate-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, Neural Stem Cells and Dopaminergic Lineage

1
Southwest National Primate Research Center, Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78245-0549, USA
2
Department of Radiology, Long School of Medicine, University of Texas Health San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: Research V, Department of Microbiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham SHEL Room 531, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35294-2182, USA.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(9), 2788; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19092788
Received: 20 July 2018 / Revised: 11 September 2018 / Accepted: 13 September 2018 / Published: 17 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Research on Neurodegenerative Diseases)
Humans and nonhuman primates (NHP) are similar in behavior and in physiology, specifically the structure, function, and complexity of the immune system. Thus, NHP models are desirable for pathophysiology and pharmacology/toxicology studies. Furthermore, NHP-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may enable transformative developmental, translational, or evolutionary studies in a field of inquiry currently hampered by the limited availability of research specimens. NHP-iPSCs may address specific questions that can be studied back and forth between in vitro cellular assays and in vivo experimentations, an investigational process that in most cases cannot be performed on humans because of safety and ethical issues. The use of NHP model systems and cell specific in vitro models is evolving with iPSC-based three-dimensional (3D) cell culture systems and organoids, which may offer reliable in vitro models and reduce the number of animals used in experimental research. IPSCs have the potential to give rise to defined cell types of any organ of the body. However, standards for deriving defined and validated NHP iPSCs are missing. Standards for deriving high-quality iPSC cell lines promote rigorous and replicable scientific research and likewise, validated cell lines reduce variability and discrepancies in results between laboratories. We have derived and validated NHP iPSC lines by confirming their pluripotency and propensity to differentiate into all three germ layers (ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm) according to standards and measurable limits for a set of marker genes. The iPSC lines were characterized for their potential to generate neural stem cells and to differentiate into dopaminergic neurons. These iPSC lines are available to the scientific community. NHP-iPSCs fulfill a unique niche in comparative genomics to understand gene regulatory principles underlying emergence of human traits, in infectious disease pathogenesis, in vaccine development, and in immunological barriers in regenerative medicine. View Full-Text
Keywords: nonhuman primate iPSC; iPSC repository; iPSC characterization; standards for pluripotency; differentiation of dopaminergic neurons; Parkinson’s disease nonhuman primate iPSC; iPSC repository; iPSC characterization; standards for pluripotency; differentiation of dopaminergic neurons; Parkinson’s disease
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yang, G.; Hong, H.; Torres, A.; Malloy, K.E.; Choudhury, G.R.; Kim, J.; Daadi, M.M. Standards for Deriving Nonhuman Primate-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, Neural Stem Cells and Dopaminergic Lineage. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 2788.

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