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Open AccessConcept Paper

Pathogens and Disease Play Havoc on the Host Epiproteome—The “First Line of Response” Role for Proteomic Changes Influenced by Disorder

The New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Ltd., 120 Mt. Albert Rd., Private Bag 92169, Auckland 1025, New Zealand
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(3), 772; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19030772
Received: 8 February 2018 / Revised: 1 March 2018 / Accepted: 7 March 2018 / Published: 8 March 2018
Organisms face stress from multiple sources simultaneously and require mechanisms to respond to these scenarios if they are to survive in the long term. This overview focuses on a series of key points that illustrate how disorder and post-translational changes can combine to play a critical role in orchestrating the response of organisms to the stress of a changing environment. Increasingly, protein complexes are thought of as dynamic multi-component molecular machines able to adapt through compositional, conformational and/or post-translational modifications to control their largely metabolic outputs. These metabolites then feed into cellular physiological homeostasis or the production of secondary metabolites with novel anti-microbial properties. The control of adaptations to stress operates at multiple levels including the proteome and the dynamic nature of proteomic changes suggests a parallel with the equally dynamic epigenetic changes at the level of nucleic acids. Given their properties, I propose that some disordered protein platforms specifically enable organisms to sense and react rapidly as the first line of response to change. Using examples from the highly dynamic host-pathogen and host-stress response, I illustrate by example how disordered proteins are key to fulfilling the need for multiple levels of integration of response at different time scales to create robust control points. View Full-Text
Keywords: intrinsically disordered proteins; epiproteome; disordered protein platform; molecular recognition feature; post-translational modifications; physiological homeostasis; stress response; RIN4; p53; molecular machines intrinsically disordered proteins; epiproteome; disordered protein platform; molecular recognition feature; post-translational modifications; physiological homeostasis; stress response; RIN4; p53; molecular machines
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rikkerink, E.H.A. Pathogens and Disease Play Havoc on the Host Epiproteome—The “First Line of Response” Role for Proteomic Changes Influenced by Disorder. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 772. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19030772

AMA Style

Rikkerink EHA. Pathogens and Disease Play Havoc on the Host Epiproteome—The “First Line of Response” Role for Proteomic Changes Influenced by Disorder. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2018; 19(3):772. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19030772

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rikkerink, Erik H.A. 2018. "Pathogens and Disease Play Havoc on the Host Epiproteome—The “First Line of Response” Role for Proteomic Changes Influenced by Disorder" Int. J. Mol. Sci. 19, no. 3: 772. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19030772

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