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Ubiquitylation at the Fork: Making and Breaking Chains to Complete DNA Replication
Open AccessReview

G Protein-Coupled Receptor Systems as Crucial Regulators of DNA Damage Response Processes

1
Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Antwerp, 2610 Antwerp, Belgium
2
Translational Neurobiology Group, Center of Molecular Neurology, VIB, 2610 Antwerp, Belgium
3
Institute of Biophysics, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, 10115 Berlin, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(10), 2919; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19102919
Received: 22 August 2018 / Revised: 14 September 2018 / Accepted: 15 September 2018 / Published: 26 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue DNA Replication Stress)
G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and their associated proteins represent one of the most diverse cellular signaling systems involved in both physiological and pathophysiological processes. Aging represents perhaps the most complex biological process in humans and involves a progressive degradation of systemic integrity and physiological resilience. This is in part mediated by age-related aberrations in energy metabolism, mitochondrial function, protein folding and sorting, inflammatory activity and genomic stability. Indeed, an increased rate of unrepaired DNA damage is considered to be one of the ‘hallmarks’ of aging. Over the last two decades our appreciation of the complexity of GPCR signaling systems has expanded their functional signaling repertoire. One such example of this is the incipient role of GPCRs and GPCR-interacting proteins in DNA damage and repair mechanisms. Emerging data now suggest that GPCRs could function as stress sensors for intracellular damage, e.g., oxidative stress. Given this role of GPCRs in the DNA damage response process, coupled to the effective history of drug targeting of these receptors, this suggests that one important future activity of GPCR therapeutics is the rational control of DNA damage repair systems. View Full-Text
Keywords: G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR); aging; DNA damage; β-arrestin; G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK); interactome; G protein-coupled receptor kinase interacting protein 2 (GIT2); ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM); clock proteins; energy metabolism G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR); aging; DNA damage; β-arrestin; G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK); interactome; G protein-coupled receptor kinase interacting protein 2 (GIT2); ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM); clock proteins; energy metabolism
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MDPI and ACS Style

Leysen, H.; Van Gastel, J.; Hendrickx, J.O.; Santos-Otte, P.; Martin, B.; Maudsley, S. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Systems as Crucial Regulators of DNA Damage Response Processes. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 2919. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19102919

AMA Style

Leysen H, Van Gastel J, Hendrickx JO, Santos-Otte P, Martin B, Maudsley S. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Systems as Crucial Regulators of DNA Damage Response Processes. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2018; 19(10):2919. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19102919

Chicago/Turabian Style

Leysen, Hanne; Van Gastel, Jaana; Hendrickx, Jhana O.; Santos-Otte, Paula; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart. 2018. "G Protein-Coupled Receptor Systems as Crucial Regulators of DNA Damage Response Processes" Int. J. Mol. Sci. 19, no. 10: 2919. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19102919

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