Next Article in Journal
Prebiotics Mediate Microbial Interactions in a Consortium of the Infant Gut Microbiome
Next Article in Special Issue
The Inhibitory Effects of Cobalt Protoporphyrin IX and Cannabinoid 2 Receptor Agonists in Type 2 Diabetic Mice
Previous Article in Journal
Hydrogen Gas Is Involved in Auxin-Induced Lateral Root Formation by Modulating Nitric Oxide Synthesis
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Endocannabinoid System and Autism Spectrum Disorders: Insights from Animal Models
Open AccessArticle

Chronic Δ9-THC Exposure Differently Affects Histone Modifications in the Adolescent and Adult Rat Brain

1
Department of Biotechnology and Life Sciences, University of Insubria, 21052 Busto Arsizio, VA, Italy
2
Neuroscience Center, University of Insubria, 21052 Busto Arsizio, VA, Italy
3
Department of Science and High Technology, University of Insubria, 21052 Busto Arsizio, VA, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(10), 2094; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18102094
Received: 20 July 2017 / Revised: 29 September 2017 / Accepted: 30 September 2017 / Published: 4 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cannabinoid Signaling in Nervous System)
Adolescence represents a vulnerable period for the psychiatric consequences of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) exposure, however, the molecular underpinnings of this vulnerability remain to be established. Histone modifications are emerging as important epigenetic mechanisms involved in the etiopathogenesis of psychiatric diseases, thus, we investigated the impact of chronic Δ9-THC exposure on histone modifications in different brain areas of female rats. We checked histone modifications associated to both transcriptional repression (H3K9 di- and tri-methylation, H3K27 tri-methylation) and activation (H3K9 and H3K14 acetylation) after adolescent and adult chronic Δ9-THC exposure in the hippocampus, nucleus accumbens, and amygdala. Chronic exposure to increasing doses of Δ9-THC for 11 days affected histone modifications in a region- and age-specific manner. The primary effect in the adolescent brain was represented by changes leading to transcriptional repression, whereas the one observed after adult treatment led to transcriptional activation. Moreover, only in the adolescent brain, the primary effect was followed by a homeostatic response to counterbalance the Δ9-THC-induced repressive effect, except in the amygdala. The presence of a more complex response in the adolescent brain may be part of the mechanisms that make the adolescent brain vulnerable to Δ9-THC adverse effects. View Full-Text
Keywords: Δ9-THC; histone modifications; adolescents; adults; nucleus accumbens; amygdala; hippocampus Δ9-THC; histone modifications; adolescents; adults; nucleus accumbens; amygdala; hippocampus
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Prini, P.; Penna, F.; Sciuccati, E.; Alberio, T.; Rubino, T. Chronic Δ9-THC Exposure Differently Affects Histone Modifications in the Adolescent and Adult Rat Brain. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18, 2094.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop