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Open AccessReview

Food Derived Bioactive Peptides and Intestinal Barrier Function

1
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 2, CIBERehd, University of Granada, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs, Granada 18071, Spain
2
Department of Pharmacology, CIBERehd, University of Granada, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs, Granada 18071, Spain
3
IBD Center, Laboratory of Immunology in Gastroenterology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Milan 20089, Italy
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2014, 15(12), 22857-22873; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms151222857
Received: 23 October 2014 / Revised: 18 November 2014 / Accepted: 2 December 2014 / Published: 9 December 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Proteins and Peptides Derived from Food)
A wide range of food-derived bioactive peptides have been shown to exert health-promoting actions and are therefore considered functional foods or nutraceuticals. Some of these actions are related to the maintenance, reinforcement or repairment of the intestinal barrier function (IBF) whose role is to selectively allow the absorption of water, nutrients and ions while preventing the influx of microorganisms from the intestinal lumen. Alterations in the IBF have been related to many disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease or metabolic syndrome. Components of IBF are the intestinal epithelium, the mucus layer, secretory immunoglobulin A and cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Here we review the effects of food derived bioactive peptides on these IBF components. In vitro and in vivo effects, both in healthy and disease states, have been reviewed. Although limited, the available information indicates a potential for food-derived peptides to modify IBF and to contribute to disease treatment, but further research is needed to better isolate responsible peptides, and to help define their mode of action. View Full-Text
Keywords: bioactive peptides; food proteins; functional foods; nutraceuticals; intestinal barrier function; mucus; immunoglobin A (IgA); innate immune response; inflammation bioactive peptides; food proteins; functional foods; nutraceuticals; intestinal barrier function; mucus; immunoglobin A (IgA); innate immune response; inflammation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Martínez-Augustin, O.; Rivero-Gutiérrez, B.; Mascaraque, C.; Sánchez de Medina, F. Food Derived Bioactive Peptides and Intestinal Barrier Function. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2014, 15, 22857-22873. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms151222857

AMA Style

Martínez-Augustin O, Rivero-Gutiérrez B, Mascaraque C, Sánchez de Medina F. Food Derived Bioactive Peptides and Intestinal Barrier Function. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2014; 15(12):22857-22873. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms151222857

Chicago/Turabian Style

Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Rivero-Gutiérrez, Belén; Mascaraque, Cristina; Sánchez de Medina, Fermín. 2014. "Food Derived Bioactive Peptides and Intestinal Barrier Function" Int. J. Mol. Sci. 15, no. 12: 22857-22873. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms151222857

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