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Review

Sustainable Use of Bioactive Compounds from Solanum Tuberosum and Brassicaceae Wastes and by-Products for Crop Protection—A Review

1
CREA Council for Agricultural Research and Economics—Research Centre for Cereal and Industrial Crops, 00198 Rome, Italy
2
CREA Council for Agricultural Research and Economics—Research Centre for Engineering and Agro-Food Processing, 00198 Rome, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editors: Simona Fabroni, Krystian Marszałek and Aldo Todaro
Molecules 2021, 26(8), 2174; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26082174
Received: 12 March 2021 / Revised: 31 March 2021 / Accepted: 1 April 2021 / Published: 9 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Discovery of Bioactive Ingredients from Natural Products)
Defatted seed meals of oleaginous Brassicaceae, such as Eruca sativa, and potato peel are excellent plant matrices to recover potentially useful biomolecules from industrial processes in a circular strategy perspective aiming at crop protection. These biomolecules, mainly glycoalkaloids and phenols for potato and glucosinolates for Brassicaceae, have been proven to be effective against microbes, fungi, nematodes, insects, and even parasitic plants. Their role in plant protection is overviewed, together with the molecular basis of their synthesis in plant, and the description of their mechanisms of action. Possible genetic and biotechnological strategies are presented to increase their content in plants. Genetic mapping and identification of closely linked molecular markers are useful to identify the loci/genes responsible for their accumulation and transfer them to elite cultivars in breeding programs. Biotechnological approaches can be used to modify their allelic sequence and enhance the accumulation of the bioactive compounds. How the global challenges, such as reducing agri-food waste and increasing sustainability and food safety, could be addressed through bioprotector applications are discussed here. View Full-Text
Keywords: sustainable food industry; waste residues; potato peel; brassica defatted meals; antifungal activity; mycotoxigenic fungi control; cereal protection; circular economy sustainable food industry; waste residues; potato peel; brassica defatted meals; antifungal activity; mycotoxigenic fungi control; cereal protection; circular economy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pacifico, D.; Lanzanova, C.; Pagnotta, E.; Bassolino, L.; Mastrangelo, A.M.; Marone, D.; Matteo, R.; Lo Scalzo, R.; Balconi, C. Sustainable Use of Bioactive Compounds from Solanum Tuberosum and Brassicaceae Wastes and by-Products for Crop Protection—A Review. Molecules 2021, 26, 2174. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26082174

AMA Style

Pacifico D, Lanzanova C, Pagnotta E, Bassolino L, Mastrangelo AM, Marone D, Matteo R, Lo Scalzo R, Balconi C. Sustainable Use of Bioactive Compounds from Solanum Tuberosum and Brassicaceae Wastes and by-Products for Crop Protection—A Review. Molecules. 2021; 26(8):2174. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26082174

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pacifico, Daniela, Chiara Lanzanova, Eleonora Pagnotta, Laura Bassolino, Anna M. Mastrangelo, Daniela Marone, Roberto Matteo, Roberto Lo Scalzo, and Carlotta Balconi. 2021. "Sustainable Use of Bioactive Compounds from Solanum Tuberosum and Brassicaceae Wastes and by-Products for Crop Protection—A Review" Molecules 26, no. 8: 2174. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26082174

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