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Review

Impact of High-Pressure Processing on Antioxidant Activity during Storage of Fruits and Fruit Products: A Review

1
Nutrition and Bromatology Group, Department of Analytical and Food Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Vigo—Ourense Campus, E32004 Ourense, Spain
2
Food Technology Area, Faculty of Sciences, University of Vigo—Ourense Campus, E32004 Ourense, Spain
3
Analytical Chemistry Group, Department of Analytical and Food Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Vigo–Ourense Campus, E32004 Ourense, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Nazimah Hamid
Molecules 2021, 26(17), 5265; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26175265
Received: 31 July 2021 / Revised: 25 August 2021 / Accepted: 26 August 2021 / Published: 30 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in High Pressure Processing on Foods)
Fruits and fruit products are an essential part of the human diet. Their health benefits are directly related to their content of valuable bioactive compounds, such as polyphenols, anthocyanins, or vitamins. Heat treatments allow the production of stable and safe products; however, their sensory quality and chemical composition are subject to significant negative changes. The use of emerging non-thermal technologies, such as HPP (High Pressure Processing), has the potential to inactivate the microbial load while exerting minimal effects on the nutritional and organoleptic properties of food products. HPP is an adequate alternative to heat treatments and simultaneously achieves the purposes of preservation and maintenance of freshness characteristics and health benefits of the final products. However, compounds responsible for antioxidant activity can be significantly affected during treatment and storage of HPP-processed products. Therefore, this article reviews the effect of HPP treatment and subsequent storage on the antioxidant activity (oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity assay, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay, 2,2′-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging capacity assay or Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assay), and on the total phenolic, flavonoid, carotenoid, anthocyanin and vitamin contents of fruits and different processed fruit-based products. View Full-Text
Keywords: high hydrostatic pressure; refrigerated or ambient storage; fruit preparations; antioxidant capacity high hydrostatic pressure; refrigerated or ambient storage; fruit preparations; antioxidant capacity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pérez-Lamela, C.; Franco, I.; Falqué, E. Impact of High-Pressure Processing on Antioxidant Activity during Storage of Fruits and Fruit Products: A Review. Molecules 2021, 26, 5265. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26175265

AMA Style

Pérez-Lamela C, Franco I, Falqué E. Impact of High-Pressure Processing on Antioxidant Activity during Storage of Fruits and Fruit Products: A Review. Molecules. 2021; 26(17):5265. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26175265

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pérez-Lamela, Concepción, Inmaculada Franco, and Elena Falqué. 2021. "Impact of High-Pressure Processing on Antioxidant Activity during Storage of Fruits and Fruit Products: A Review" Molecules 26, no. 17: 5265. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26175265

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