Next Article in Journal
Development of a Rapid Mass Spectrometric Determination of AMP and Cyclic AMP for PDE3 Activity Study: Application and Computational Analysis for Evaluating the Effect of a Novel 2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carbonitrile Derivative as PDE-3 Inhibitor
Next Article in Special Issue
Biophenolic Compounds Influence the In-Mouth Perceived Intensity of Virgin Olive Oil Flavours and Off-Flavours
Previous Article in Journal
Thermodynamic, Physical, and Structural Characteristics in Layered Hybrid Type (C2H5NH3)2MCl4 (M = 59Co, 63Cu, 65Zn, and 113Cd) Crystals
Previous Article in Special Issue
Key Aroma Compounds of Dark Chocolates Differing in Organoleptic Properties: A GC-O Comparative Study
Article

Volatile Profile of Mead Fermenting Blossom Honey and Honeydew Honey with or without Ribes nigrum

1
Laimburg Research Centre, Ora (BZ), 39040 Auer, Italy
2
Institute of Food Technology, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU), 1190 Vienna, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Eugenio Aprea
Molecules 2020, 25(8), 1818; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25081818
Received: 27 March 2020 / Revised: 10 April 2020 / Accepted: 11 April 2020 / Published: 15 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volatile Compounds and Smell Chemicals (Odor and Aroma) of Food)
Mead is a not very diffused alcoholic beverage and is obtained by fermentation of honey and water. Despite its very long tradition, little information is available on the relation between the ingredient used during fermentation and the aromatic characteristics of the fermented beverage outcome. In order to provide further information, multi-floral blossom honey and a forest honeydew honey with and without the addition of black currant during fermentation were used to prepare four different honey wines to be compared for their volatile organic compound content. Fermentation was monitored, and the total phenolic content (Folin–Ciocalteu), volatile organic compounds (HS-SPME-GC-MS), together with a sensory evaluation on the overall quality (44 nontrained panelists) were measured for all products at the end of fermentation. A higher total phenolic content resulted in honeydew honey meads, as well as the correspondent honey wine prepared with black currant. A total of 46 volatile organic compounds for pre-fermentation samples and 62 for post-fermentation samples were identified belonging to higher alcohols, organic acids, esters, and terpenes. The sensory analysis showed that the difference in meads made from blossom honey and honeydew honey was perceptible by the panelists with a general greater appreciation for the traditional blossom honey mead. These results demonstrated the influences of different components in meads, in particular, the influence of honey quality. However, further studies are needed to establish the relationship between the chemical profile and mead flavor perception. View Full-Text
Keywords: gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; fermentation; honey; black currant gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; fermentation; honey; black currant
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Chitarrini, G.; Debiasi, L.; Stuffer, M.; Ueberegger, E.; Zehetner, E.; Jaeger, H.; Robatscher, P.; Conterno, L. Volatile Profile of Mead Fermenting Blossom Honey and Honeydew Honey with or without Ribes nigrum. Molecules 2020, 25, 1818. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25081818

AMA Style

Chitarrini G, Debiasi L, Stuffer M, Ueberegger E, Zehetner E, Jaeger H, Robatscher P, Conterno L. Volatile Profile of Mead Fermenting Blossom Honey and Honeydew Honey with or without Ribes nigrum. Molecules. 2020; 25(8):1818. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25081818

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chitarrini, Giulia, Luca Debiasi, Mary Stuffer, Eva Ueberegger, Egon Zehetner, Henry Jaeger, Peter Robatscher, and Lorenza Conterno. 2020. "Volatile Profile of Mead Fermenting Blossom Honey and Honeydew Honey with or without Ribes nigrum" Molecules 25, no. 8: 1818. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25081818

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop