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Open AccessArticle

Laser-Plasma Spatiotemporal Cyanide Spectroscopy and Applications

1
Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Tennessee, University of Tennessee Space Institute, Center for Laser Applications, 411 B.H. Goethert Parkway, Tullahoma, TN 37388, USA
2
Nuclear Engineering Department, University of Tennessee, Tickle College of Engineering, 1412 Circle Drive, Knoxville, TN 37912, USA
3
Physics and Applied Physics Department, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854, USA
4
Wellinq Medical, Van der Waals Park 22, 9351 VC Leek, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Molecules 2020, 25(3), 615; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25030615
Received: 13 January 2020 / Revised: 28 January 2020 / Accepted: 28 January 2020 / Published: 31 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Practical Applications of Molecular Spectroscopy)
This article reports new measurements of laser-induced plasma hypersonic expansion measurements of diatomic molecular cyanide (CN). Focused, high-peak-power 1064 nm Q-switched radiation of the order of 1 TW/cm 2 generated optical breakdown plasma in a cell containing a 1:1 molar gas mixture of N 2 and CO 2 at a fixed pressure of 1.1 × 10 5 Pascal and in a 100 mL/min flow of the mixture. Line-of-sight (LOS) analysis of recorded molecular spectra indicated the outgoing shockwave at expansion speeds well in excess of Mach 5. Spectra of atomic carbon confirmed increased electron density near the shockwave, and, equally, molecular CN spectra revealed higher excitation temperature near the shockwave. Results were consistent with corresponding high-speed shadowgraphs obtained by visualization with an effective shutter speed of 5 nanoseconds. In addition, LOS analysis and the application of integral inversion techniques allow inferences about the spatiotemporal plasma distribution. View Full-Text
Keywords: plasma diagnostics; molecular spectra; diatomic molecules; plasma spectroscopy; laser spectroscopy; laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy; optical emission spectroscopy; hypersonic expansion plasma diagnostics; molecular spectra; diatomic molecules; plasma spectroscopy; laser spectroscopy; laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy; optical emission spectroscopy; hypersonic expansion
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MDPI and ACS Style

Parigger, C.G.; Helstern, C.M.; Jordan, B.S.; Surmick, D.M.; Splinter, R. Laser-Plasma Spatiotemporal Cyanide Spectroscopy and Applications. Molecules 2020, 25, 615.

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