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Article

Sugar Profiling of Honeys for Authentication and Detection of Adulterants Using High-Performance Thin Layer Chromatography

1
Cooperative Research Centre for Honey Bee Products Limited (CRC HBP), University of Western Australia, Perth 6009, Australia
2
Division of Pharmacy, School of Allied Health, University of Western Australia, Perth 6009, Australia
3
School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth 6009, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Soraia I. Falcão
Molecules 2020, 25(22), 5289; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25225289
Received: 8 October 2020 / Revised: 10 November 2020 / Accepted: 11 November 2020 / Published: 13 November 2020
Honey adulteration, where a range of sugar syrups is used to increase bulk volume, is a common problem that has significant negative impacts on the honey industry, both economically and from a consumer confidence perspective. This paper investigates High-Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC) for the authentication and detection of sugar adulterants in honey. The sugar composition of various Australian honeys (Manuka, Jarrah, Marri, Karri, Peppermint and White Gum) was first determined to illustrate the variance depending on the floral origin. Two of the honeys (Manuka and Jarrah) were then artificially adulterated with six different sugar syrups (rice, corn, golden, treacle, glucose and maple syrup). The findings demonstrate that HPTLC sugar profiles, in combination with organic extract profiles, can easily detect the sugar adulterants. As major sugars found in honey, the quantification of fructose and glucose, and their concentration ratio can be used to authenticate the honeys. Quantifications of sucrose and maltose can be used to identify the type of syrup adulterant, in particular when used in combination with HPTLC fingerprinting of the organic honey extracts. View Full-Text
Keywords: honey; sugar syrup; adulteration; Jarrah; Manuka honey; sugar syrup; adulteration; Jarrah; Manuka
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MDPI and ACS Style

Islam, M.K.; Sostaric, T.; Lim, L.Y.; Hammer, K.; Locher, C. Sugar Profiling of Honeys for Authentication and Detection of Adulterants Using High-Performance Thin Layer Chromatography. Molecules 2020, 25, 5289. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25225289

AMA Style

Islam MK, Sostaric T, Lim LY, Hammer K, Locher C. Sugar Profiling of Honeys for Authentication and Detection of Adulterants Using High-Performance Thin Layer Chromatography. Molecules. 2020; 25(22):5289. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25225289

Chicago/Turabian Style

Islam, Md K., Tomislav Sostaric, Lee Y. Lim, Katherine Hammer, and Cornelia Locher. 2020. "Sugar Profiling of Honeys for Authentication and Detection of Adulterants Using High-Performance Thin Layer Chromatography" Molecules 25, no. 22: 5289. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25225289

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