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…Fell Upas Sits, the Hydra-Tree of Death , or the Phytotoxicity of Trees

1
Forest Biotechnology Group, Branch of Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 6 Prospect Nauki, Pushchino, 142290 Moscow, Russia
2
Department of Forest Genetics and Forest Tree Breeding, Georg-August University of Göttingen, Büsgenweg 2, 37077 Göttingen, Germany
3
Laboratory of Population Genetics, Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Gubkina Str. 3, 119991 Moscow, Russia
4
Laboratory of Forest Genomics, Genome Research and Education Center, Institute of Fundamental Biology and Biotechnology, Siberian Federal University, 50a/2 Akademgorodok, 660036 Krasnoyarsk, Russia
5
Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, Texas A&M University, 495 Horticulture Rd, College Station, TX 77843-2138, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Erasmus Darwin, from The Loves of the Plants (1789).
Academic Editor: Vincenzo De Feo
Molecules 2019, 24(8), 1636; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24081636
Received: 10 April 2019 / Revised: 22 April 2019 / Accepted: 23 April 2019 / Published: 25 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products Acting as Insecticides or Herbicides)
The use of natural products that can serve as natural herbicides and insecticides is a promising direction because of their greater safety for humans and environment. Secondary metabolites of plants that are toxic to plants and insects—allelochemicals—can be used as such products. Woody plants can produce allelochemicals, but they are studied much less than herbaceous species. Meanwhile, there is a problem of interaction of woody species with neighboring plants in the process of introduction or invasion, co-cultivation with agricultural crops (agroforestry) or in plantation forestry (multiclonal or multispecies plantations). This review describes woody plants with the greatest allelopathic potential, allelochemicals derived from them, and the prospects for their use as biopesticides. In addition, the achievement of and the prospects for the use of biotechnology methods in relation to the allelopathy of woody plants are presented and discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: allelopathy; tree species; secondary methabolits; herbicidal activity; insecticidal activity; biopesticides; transgenic plants allelopathy; tree species; secondary methabolits; herbicidal activity; insecticidal activity; biopesticides; transgenic plants
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lebedev, V.G.; Krutovsky, K.V.; Shestibratov, K.A. …Fell Upas Sits, the Hydra-Tree of Death , or the Phytotoxicity of Trees. Molecules 2019, 24, 1636. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24081636

AMA Style

Lebedev VG, Krutovsky KV, Shestibratov KA. …Fell Upas Sits, the Hydra-Tree of Death , or the Phytotoxicity of Trees. Molecules. 2019; 24(8):1636. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24081636

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lebedev, Vadim G.; Krutovsky, Konstantin V.; Shestibratov, Konstantin A. 2019. "…Fell Upas Sits, the Hydra-Tree of Death , or the Phytotoxicity of Trees" Molecules 24, no. 8: 1636. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24081636

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