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Contributions of Mass Spectrometry to the Identification of Low Molecular Weight Molecules Able to Reduce the Toxicity of Amyloid-β Peptide to Cell Cultures and Transgenic Mouse Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

1
Center for Advanced Research and Development in Experimental Medicine (CEMEX), “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 16 Universității Street, 700115 Iaşi, Romania
2
Faculty of Pharmacy, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 16 Universităṭii Street, 700115 Iaşi, Romania
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Mark Brönstrup
Molecules 2019, 24(6), 1167; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24061167
Received: 7 March 2019 / Revised: 22 March 2019 / Accepted: 22 March 2019 / Published: 24 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mass Spectroscopy in Chemical Biology)
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Abstract

Alzheimer’s Disease affects approximately 33 million people worldwide and is characterized by progressive loss of memory at the cognitive level. The formation of toxic amyloid oligomers, extracellular amyloid plaques and amyloid angiopathy in brain by amyloid beta peptides are considered a part of the identified mechanism involved in disease pathogenesis. The optimal treatment approach leads toward finding a chemical compound able to form a noncovalent complex with the amyloid peptide thus blocking the process of amyloid aggregation. This direction gained an increasing interest lately, many studies demonstrating that mass spectrometry is a valuable method useful for the identification and characterization of such molecules able to interact with amyloid peptides. In the present review we aim to identify in the scientific literature low molecular weight chemical compounds for which there is mass spectrometric evidence of noncovalent complex formation with amyloid peptides and also there are toxicity reduction results which verify the effects of these compounds on amyloid beta toxicity towards cell cultures and transgenic mouse models developing Alzheimer’s Disease. View Full-Text
Keywords: Alzheimer’s Disease; amyloid-β peptides; mass spectrometry; proteolytic enzymes; anti-aggregating compounds; in vitro models; cell viability; transgenic mouse models; cognitive dysfunction; spatial working memory Alzheimer’s Disease; amyloid-β peptides; mass spectrometry; proteolytic enzymes; anti-aggregating compounds; in vitro models; cell viability; transgenic mouse models; cognitive dysfunction; spatial working memory
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Ştefănescu, R.; Stanciu, G.D.; Luca, A.; Caba, I.C.; Tamba, B.I.; Mihai, C.T. Contributions of Mass Spectrometry to the Identification of Low Molecular Weight Molecules Able to Reduce the Toxicity of Amyloid-β Peptide to Cell Cultures and Transgenic Mouse Models of Alzheimer’s Disease. Molecules 2019, 24, 1167.

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