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Article

Probing the Effects of Pyrimidine Functional Group Switches on Acyclic Fleximer Analogues for Antiviral Activity

1
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250, USA
2
Viral Special Pathogens Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA
3
Slovenian NMR Center, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Luigi A. Agrofoglio
Molecules 2019, 24(17), 3184; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24173184
Received: 2 August 2019 / Revised: 30 August 2019 / Accepted: 31 August 2019 / Published: 2 September 2019
Due to their ability to inhibit viral DNA or RNA replication, nucleoside analogues have been used for decades as potent antiviral therapeutics. However, one of the major limitations of nucleoside analogues is the development of antiviral resistance. In that regard, flexible nucleoside analogues known as “fleximers” have garnered attention over the years due to their ability to survey different amino acids in enzyme binding sites, thus overcoming the potential development of antiviral resistance. Acyclic fleximers have previously demonstrated antiviral activity against numerous viruses including Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), Ebola virus (EBOV), and, most recently, flaviviruses such as Dengue (DENV) and Yellow Fever Virus (YFV). Due to these interesting results, a Structure Activity Relationship (SAR) study was pursued in order to analyze the effect of the pyrimidine functional group and acyl protecting group on antiviral activity, cytotoxicity, and conformation. The results of those studies are presented herein. View Full-Text
Keywords: nucleoside; SAR; filovirus; flavivirus; fleximers nucleoside; SAR; filovirus; flavivirus; fleximers
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yates, M.K.; Chatterjee, P.; Flint, M.; Arefeayne, Y.; Makuc, D.; Plavec, J.; Spiropoulou, C.F.; Seley-Radtke, K.L. Probing the Effects of Pyrimidine Functional Group Switches on Acyclic Fleximer Analogues for Antiviral Activity. Molecules 2019, 24, 3184. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24173184

AMA Style

Yates MK, Chatterjee P, Flint M, Arefeayne Y, Makuc D, Plavec J, Spiropoulou CF, Seley-Radtke KL. Probing the Effects of Pyrimidine Functional Group Switches on Acyclic Fleximer Analogues for Antiviral Activity. Molecules. 2019; 24(17):3184. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24173184

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yates, Mary K., Payel Chatterjee, Mike Flint, Yafet Arefeayne, Damjan Makuc, Janez Plavec, Christina F. Spiropoulou, and Katherine L. Seley-Radtke 2019. "Probing the Effects of Pyrimidine Functional Group Switches on Acyclic Fleximer Analogues for Antiviral Activity" Molecules 24, no. 17: 3184. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24173184

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