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Essential Oils as Antimicrobial Agents—Myth or Real Alternative?

1
Department of Chemistry, Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Norwida 25, 50-375 Wrocław, Poland
2
Department of Fermentation and Cereals Technology, Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Chełmońskiego 37/41, 51-630 Wrocław, Poland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Francesca Mancianti
Molecules 2019, 24(11), 2130; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24112130
Received: 30 April 2019 / Revised: 3 June 2019 / Accepted: 4 June 2019 / Published: 5 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Activities of Essential Oils)
Herbs and the essential oils derived from them have been used from the beginning of human history for different purposes. Their beneficial properties have been applied to mask unpleasant odors, attract the attention of other people, add flavor and aroma properties to prepared dishes, perfumes, and cosmetics, etc. Herbs and essential oils (EOs) have also been used in medicine because of their biological properties, such as larvicidal action, analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties, antioxidant, fungicide, and antitumor activities, and many more. Many EOs exhibit antimicrobial properties, which is extremely important in fields of science and industry, such as medicine, agriculture, or cosmetology. Among the 250 EOs which are commercially available, about a dozen possess high antimicrobial potential. According to available papers and patents, EOs seem to be a potential alternative to synthetic compounds, especially because of the resistance that has been increasingly developed by pathogenic microorganisms. In this review we summarize the latest research studies about the most-active EOs that are known and used because of their antimicrobial properties. Finally, it is noteworthy that the antimicrobial activities of EOs are not preeminent for all strains. Further investigations should, thus, focus on targeting EOs and microorganisms. View Full-Text
Keywords: essential oils; antibacterial activity; antifungal activity; lavender oil; thyme oil; peppermint oil; cajuput oil; cinnamon oil; eucalyptus oil; clove oil; sage oil; tea tree oil essential oils; antibacterial activity; antifungal activity; lavender oil; thyme oil; peppermint oil; cajuput oil; cinnamon oil; eucalyptus oil; clove oil; sage oil; tea tree oil
MDPI and ACS Style

Wińska, K.; Mączka, W.; Łyczko, J.; Grabarczyk, M.; Czubaszek, A.; Szumny, A. Essential Oils as Antimicrobial Agents—Myth or Real Alternative? Molecules 2019, 24, 2130.

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