Next Article in Journal
Design of Novel Pyrene-Bodipy Dyads: Synthesis, Characterization, Optical Properties, and FRET Studies
Previous Article in Journal
Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Properties of Rosmarinic Acid in Rat Cholestatic Liver Injury
Article Menu
Issue 9 (September) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Molecules 2018, 23(9), 2288; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23092288

Antimicrobial Photodynamic Inactivation Mediated by Rose Bengal and Erythrosine Is Effective in the Control of Food-Related Bacteria in Planktonic and Biofilm States

1
Postgraduate Program of Health Sciences, State University of Maringá, Av. Colombo, 5790, Maringá 87020-900, Paraná, Brazil
2
LEPABE, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, s/n, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
3
Department of Chemistry, State University of Maringa, Av. Colombo, 5790, Maringá 87020-900, Paraná, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 3 August 2018 / Revised: 28 August 2018 / Accepted: 5 September 2018 / Published: 7 September 2018
Full-Text   |   PDF [2122 KB, uploaded 7 September 2018]   |  

Abstract

The thermal and chemical-based methods applied for microbial control in the food industry are not always environmentally friendly and may change the nutritional and organoleptic characteristics of the final products. Moreover, the efficacy of sanitizing agents may be reduced when microbial cells are enclosed in biofilms. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of photodynamic inactivation, using two xanthene dyes (rose bengal and erythrosine) as photosensitizing agents and green LED as a light source, against Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria innocua, Enterococcus hirae and Escherichia coli in both planktonic and biofilm states. Both photosensitizing agents were able to control planktonic cells of all bacteria tested. The treatments altered the physicochemical properties of cells surface and also induced potassium leakage, indicating damage of cell membranes. Although higher concentrations of the photosensitizing agents (ranging from 0.01 to 50.0 μmol/L) were needed to be applied, the culturability of biofilm cells was reduced to undetectable levels. This finding was confirmed by the live/dead staining, where propidium iodide-labeled bacteria numbers reached up to 100%. The overall results demonstrated that photoinactivation by rose bengal and erythrosine may be a powerful candidate for the control of planktonic cells and biofilms in the food sector. View Full-Text
Keywords: biofilms; erythrosine; food-related bacteria; light emitting diode; photodynamic inactivation; rose bengal biofilms; erythrosine; food-related bacteria; light emitting diode; photodynamic inactivation; rose bengal
Figures

Graphical abstract

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Silva, A.F.; Borges, A.; Freitas, C.F.; Hioka, N.; Mikcha, J.M.G.; Simões, M. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Inactivation Mediated by Rose Bengal and Erythrosine Is Effective in the Control of Food-Related Bacteria in Planktonic and Biofilm States. Molecules 2018, 23, 2288.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Molecules EISSN 1420-3049 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top