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Molecules 2018, 23(2), 484; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23020484

Impact of Storage Conditions on the Stability of Predominant Phenolic Constituents and Antioxidant Activity of Dried Piper betle Extracts

1
School of Engineering, Taylor’s University, Lakeside Campus, No 1, Jalan Taylor’s, Subang Jaya, Selangor 47500, Malaysia
2
School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Malaysia Campus, No 1 Jalan Venna P5/2, Precinct 5, Putrajaya 62200, Malaysia
3
School of Biosciences, Taylor’s University, Lakeside Campus, No 1, Jalan Taylor’s, Subang Jaya, Selangor 47500, Malaysia
4
Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University Putra Malaysia, UPM Serdang, Selangor 43400, Malaysia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 November 2017 / Revised: 13 December 2017 / Accepted: 18 December 2017 / Published: 23 February 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Natural Products Chemistry)
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Abstract

The phenolic constituents in Piper betle are well known for their antioxidant potential; however, current literature has very little information on their stability under the influence of storage factors. Present study evaluated the stability of total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activity together with individual phenolic constituents (hydroxychavicol, eugenol, isoeugenol and allylpyrocatechol 3,4-diacetate) present in dried Piper betle’s extract under different storage temperature of 5 and 25 °C with and without light for a period of six months. Both light and temperature significantly influenced TPC and its corresponding antioxidant activity over time. More than 95% TPC and antioxidant activity was retained at 5 °C in dark condition after 180 days of storage. Hydroxychavicol demonstrated the best stability with no degradation while eugenol and isoeugenol displayed moderate stability in low temperature (5 °C) and dark conditions. 4-allyl-1,2-diacetoxybenzene was the only compound that underwent complete degradation. A new compound, 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol, was detected after five weeks of storage only in the extracts exposed to light. Both zero-order and first-order kinetic models were adopted to describe the degradation kinetics of the extract’s antioxidant activity. Zero-order displayed better fit with higher correlation coefficients (R2 = 0.9046) and the half-life was determined as 62 days for the optimised storage conditions (5 °C in dark conditions). View Full-Text
Keywords: Piper betle; storage; stability; total phenolic content; antioxidant capacity Piper betle; storage; stability; total phenolic content; antioxidant capacity
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

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Ali, A.; Chong, C.H.; Mah, S.H.; Abdullah, L.C.; Choong, T.S.Y.; Chua, B.L. Impact of Storage Conditions on the Stability of Predominant Phenolic Constituents and Antioxidant Activity of Dried Piper betle Extracts. Molecules 2018, 23, 484.

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