Next Article in Journal
On the Variability of Functional Connectivity and Network Measures in Source-Reconstructed EEG Time-Series
Next Article in Special Issue
Entropic Dynamics on Gibbs Statistical Manifolds
Previous Article in Journal
A Review of Intelligent Fault Diagnosis for High-Speed Trains: Qualitative Approaches
Previous Article in Special Issue
Interpreting Social Accounting Matrix (SAM) as an Information Channel
 
 
Article

Associations between Neurocardiovascular Signal Entropy and Physical Frailty

1
The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA), School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, D02 R590 Dublin, Ireland
2
Discipline of Medical Gerontology, School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, D02 R590 Dublin, Ireland
3
School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, The Patrick G Johnston Centre for Cancer Research, Queen’s University, Belfast BT9 7BL, UK
4
Mercer’s Institute for Successful Ageing (MISA), St. James’s Hospital, D08 NHY1 Dublin, Ireland
5
Global Brain Health Institute, Trinity College Dublin, D02 DK07 Dublin, Ireland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Entropy 2021, 23(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/e23010004
Received: 30 November 2020 / Revised: 16 December 2020 / Accepted: 19 December 2020 / Published: 22 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entropy: The Scientific Tool of the 21st Century)
In this cross-sectional study, the relationship between noninvasively measured neurocardiovascular signal entropy and physical frailty was explored in a sample of community-dwelling older adults from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA). The hypothesis under investigation was that dysfunction in the neurovascular and cardiovascular systems, as quantified by short-length signal complexity during a lying-to-stand test (active stand), could provide a marker for frailty. Frailty status (i.e., “non-frail”, “pre-frail”, and “frail”) was based on Fried’s criteria (i.e., exhaustion, unexplained weight loss, weakness, slowness, and low physical activity). Approximate entropy (ApEn) and sample entropy (SampEn) were calculated during resting (lying down), active standing, and recovery phases. There was continuously measured blood pressure/heart rate data from 2645 individuals (53.0% female) and frontal lobe tissue oxygenation data from 2225 participants (52.3% female); both samples had a mean (SD) age of 64.3 (7.7) years. Results revealed statistically significant associations between neurocardiovascular signal entropy and frailty status. Entropy differences between non-frail and pre-frail/frail were greater during resting state compared with standing and recovery phases. Compared with ApEn, SampEn seemed to have better discriminating power between non-frail and pre-frail/frail individuals. The quantification of entropy in short length neurocardiovascular signals could provide a clinically useful marker of the multiple physiological dysregulations that underlie physical frailty.
View Full-Text
Keywords: approximate entropy; sample entropy; physical frailty; cardiovascular; neurovascular; blood pressure; heart rate; frontal lobe oxygenation; near infrared spectroscopy; NIRS; TILDA approximate entropy; sample entropy; physical frailty; cardiovascular; neurovascular; blood pressure; heart rate; frontal lobe oxygenation; near infrared spectroscopy; NIRS; TILDA
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Knight, S.P.; Newman, L.; O’Connor, J.D.; Davis, J.; Kenny, R.A.; Romero-Ortuno, R. Associations between Neurocardiovascular Signal Entropy and Physical Frailty. Entropy 2021, 23, 4. https://doi.org/10.3390/e23010004

AMA Style

Knight SP, Newman L, O’Connor JD, Davis J, Kenny RA, Romero-Ortuno R. Associations between Neurocardiovascular Signal Entropy and Physical Frailty. Entropy. 2021; 23(1):4. https://doi.org/10.3390/e23010004

Chicago/Turabian Style

Knight, Silvin P., Louise Newman, John D. O’Connor, James Davis, Rose Anne Kenny, and Roman Romero-Ortuno. 2021. "Associations between Neurocardiovascular Signal Entropy and Physical Frailty" Entropy 23, no. 1: 4. https://doi.org/10.3390/e23010004

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop