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Potential Exergy Storage Capacity of Salt Caverns in the Cheshire Basin Using Adiabatic Compressed Air Energy Storage

School of Engineering, The University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
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Entropy 2019, 21(11), 1065; https://doi.org/10.3390/e21111065
Received: 30 September 2019 / Revised: 28 October 2019 / Accepted: 29 October 2019 / Published: 30 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Thermodynamic Approaches in Modern Engineering Systems)
As the number of renewable energy sources connected to the grid has increased, the need to address the intermittency of these sources becomes essential. One solution to this problem is to install energy storage technologies on the grid to provide a buffer between supply and demand. One such energy storage technology is Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES), which is suited to large-scale, long-term energy storage. Large scale CAES requires underground storage caverns, such as the salt caverns situated in the Cheshire Basin, UK. This study uses cavern data from the Cheshire Basin as a basis for performing an energy and exergy analysis of 10 simulated CAES systems to determine the exergy storage potential of the caverns in the Cheshire Basin and the associated work and power input and output. The analysis revealed that a full charge of all 10 caverns could store 25.32 GWh of exergy, which can be converted to 23.19 GWh of work, which requires 43.27 GWh of work to produce, giving a round trip efficiency of around 54%. This corresponds to an input power of 670.07 GW and an output power of 402.74 GW. The Cheshire Basin could support around 100 such CAES plants, giving a potential total exergy storage capacity of 2.53 TWh and a power output of 40 TW. This is a significant amount of storage which could be used to support the UK grid. The total exergy destroyed during a full charge, store, and discharge cycle for each cavern ranged from 299.02 MWh to 1600.00 MWh. View Full-Text
Keywords: compressed air energy storage; exergy; energy storage; exergy destruction; energy analysis; salt caverns compressed air energy storage; exergy; energy storage; exergy destruction; energy analysis; salt caverns
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Dooner, M.; Wang, J. Potential Exergy Storage Capacity of Salt Caverns in the Cheshire Basin Using Adiabatic Compressed Air Energy Storage. Entropy 2019, 21, 1065.

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