Special Issue "Humanities in Health Professions Education and Practice"

A special issue of Humanities (ISSN 2076-0787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 August 2015).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Sara Horton-Deutsch Website E-Mail
Professor and Watson Human Caring Science Endowed Chair, College of Nursing, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO 80045, USA
Phone: 303-724-8460
Interests: reflective practice; mindfulness; reflective pedagogies; leadership development; caring science; presence and engagement in online learning
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Pamela Ironside Website E-Mail
Professor, School of Nursing, Indiana University, 1111 Middle Drive, NU345F Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA
Phone: + 317-274-8604
Interests: narrative pedagogy; Hermeneutic phenomenology; clinical learning; teacher preparation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Manuscripts focusing on innovative pedagogical projects, and research or other scholarly or creative initiatives that support learning and/or the development of caring practice. Submissions should be one of the following types:

  • Articles: The editors invite research or scholarly manuscripts related to health professions education and practice that have neither been published before nor are under consideration for publication in another journal. Research articles should include a description of the design and methods used, but the editors encourage authors to report study findings in either traditional or creative ways. Other scholarly work providing philosophical explication of current, emerging, or future trends is also welcome. In each case, the report should make a clear contribution to knowledge of the field.
  • Short communications: The editors invite submission of pilot studies or studies of limited scope if the findings and significance of the work are clear. Authors should also clearly identify the implications for future study.
  • Reviews: The editors invite review manuscripts that provide concise and precise updates on the latest progress made in a given area of research or scholarship. The review must address the implications for health professions education and practice.
  • Innovations: The editors invite papers describing specific innovative strategies, methods or cases that are grounded in current research and have demonstrated significant impact on health professions education or practice. Innovation papers must be clearly situated in current knowledge and practice with a detailed description of what was done, how it was done, and the specific impact or outcomes achieved.

Prof. Dr. Sara Horton-Deutsch
Prof. Dr. Pamela Ironside
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Humanities is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

References:

An-bang Yu (2014). The encounter of nursing and the clinical nursing humanities: Nursing education and the spirit of healing. Humanities, 3, 660-674.

Diekelmann, N., & Diekelmann, J. (2009). The path of this work: Hermeneutic phenomenology. In Schooling learning teaching: Toward narrative pedagogy (Ch. 1, pp. 3-34). Bloomington, IN: iUniverse Press.

Horton-Deutsch, S., Young, T. & Nelson, K. (2010). Becoming a nurse faculty leader: Facing challenges through reflecting, persevering, and learning to relate with others new ways. Journal of Nursing Management, 18, 487-493.

Ironside, P.M. (2014). Enabling narrative pedagogy: Inviting, waiting and letting-be. Nursing Education Perspectives, 35(3), 212-218.

Lombard, K. & Horton-Deutsch, S. (2012). Creating space for reflection: The importance of presence in the teaching~learning process. In G. Sherwood & S. Horton-Deutsch (Eds.). Reflective Practice: Transforming Education and Improving Outcomes. Indianapolis: Sigma Theta Tau International.

McGeehin Heilferty, C. (2011). Ethical considerations in the study of online illness narratives: A qualitative review. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 67, 945-953.

Nordby, H. (2007). Meaning and normativity in the nurse-patient interaction. Nursing Philosophy, 8, 16-27.

Smythe, E., Ironside, P. M., Sims, S. L., Swenson, M. M., & Spence, D. G. (2008). Heideggerian hermeneutic research: As lived. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 45, 1389–1397.

Smythe, E., & Spence, D. (2012). Re-viewing literature in hermeneutic research. International Journal of Qualitative Methods, 11, 12-25.

Stiles, K., Horton-Deutsch, S, & Andrews, C. (2014). The nurse’s lived experience of becoming an interprofessional leader. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 45(11), 487-493.

Sunvisson, H., Habermann, B., Weiss, S., & Benner, P. (2009). Augmenting the Cartesian medical discourse with an understanding of the persons lifeworld, lived body, life story and social identity. Nursing Philosophy, 10, 241-252.

Keywords

  • Clinical humanities
  • nursing
  • caring
  • healing
  • health professions education
  • interdisciplinary/interprofessional education, caring practice;
  • leadership

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Watson’s Human Caring Theory: Pertinent Transpersonal and Humanities Concepts for Educators
Humanities 2016, 5(2), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/h5020021 - 16 Apr 2016
Cited by 5
Abstract
Jean Watson’s Theory of Human Caring and the caring moment are based in part in the concepts of transpersonal psychology. This paper will provide a historical background around transpersonal psychology and how it relates to Watson’s human caring moment. The purpose of explicating [...] Read more.
Jean Watson’s Theory of Human Caring and the caring moment are based in part in the concepts of transpersonal psychology. This paper will provide a historical background around transpersonal psychology and how it relates to Watson’s human caring moment. The purpose of explicating these humanities-based concepts is to support nurses and nurse educators in creating a deeper understanding of Watson’s caring-healing moment as a time-space continuum, where the nurse’s caring supports a mutually created environment for healing. The article provides useful background information, as well as outlining simple steps to revising nursing curricula so that they become supportive of nursing students’ growth as transpersonal-caring beings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Humanities in Health Professions Education and Practice)
Open AccessArticle
Enabling Narrative Pedagogy: Listening in Nursing Education
Humanities 2016, 5(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/h5010016 - 24 Feb 2016
Cited by 1
Abstract
The role of the nurse has become considerably more demanding in the past twenty years through increased complexity of patient care within a rapidly changing health care environment. Research is needed to expand the pedagogical literacy of nurse educators and address the needs [...] Read more.
The role of the nurse has become considerably more demanding in the past twenty years through increased complexity of patient care within a rapidly changing health care environment. Research is needed to expand the pedagogical literacy of nurse educators and address the needs of students entering a complex health care system. Narrative Pedagogy was identified as a research-based nursing pedagogy and has been enabled in nursing education for over a decade. The Concernful Practices emerged from Narrative Pedagogy research, which helped identify what teachers, students, and clinicians considered meaningful in teaching. Listening was one of the Concernful Practices and became the focus of this study. This hermeneutic phenomenological study provided new understandings of the experience of listening in nursing education. The research question addressed “How do nurse educators who enable Narrative Pedagogy experience Listening: knowing and connecting?” One of the themes, Listening as Dialogue, emerged from the study and included ways nurse educators can open and interpret a dialogue, shift the way they think about teaching, and make connections with students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Humanities in Health Professions Education and Practice)
Open AccessArticle
A Critical Hermeneutic Analysis of Presence in Nursing Practice
Humanities 2015, 4(4), 958-976; https://doi.org/10.3390/h4040958 - 09 Dec 2015
Abstract
Nursing presence, although it involves action at times, is a humanitarian quality of relating to a patient that is known to have powerful and positive implications for both nurse and patient. However, this phenomenon has not been well understood. Three theories, drawn from [...] Read more.
Nursing presence, although it involves action at times, is a humanitarian quality of relating to a patient that is known to have powerful and positive implications for both nurse and patient. However, this phenomenon has not been well understood. Three theories, drawn from the work of Paul Ricoeur and Hans-Georg Gadamer, served as the boundaries for both data collection and analysis. The theories were narrative identity, play and solicitude. This study follows a critical hermeneutic approach to field research and data analysis. Literature regarding nursing presence is reviewed and discussed, and in-depth conversations with eleven participants are recorded. Examining the phenomenon of nursing presence through the hermeneutic lenses of narrative identity, play and solicitude has elucidated the role of ethical orientation, creativity and connection with the human experience through exploration of self and other. This more nuanced and complex understanding adds depth to the conversation and offers new possibilities to the effort to encourage and support presence in nursing practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Humanities in Health Professions Education and Practice)
Open AccessArticle
“Oh, this is What It Feels Like”: A Role for the Body in Learning an Evidence-Based Practice
Humanities 2015, 4(4), 861-884; https://doi.org/10.3390/h4040861 - 27 Nov 2015
Abstract
This paper will present research that explored the experiences of couple and family therapists learning about and using an evidence-based practice (EBP). Using a phenomenological approach called Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis, three themes emerged from the participants’ experiences: the supports and challenges while learning [...] Read more.
This paper will present research that explored the experiences of couple and family therapists learning about and using an evidence-based practice (EBP). Using a phenomenological approach called Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis, three themes emerged from the participants’ experiences: the supports and challenges while learning an EBP, the experience of shame while learning, and the embodiment of a therapy practice. This paper will focus on the theme of embodiment. Research participants’ experiences will be reviewed and further explored using Merleau-Ponty’s notion of embodiment and Gendlin’s (1978) more internally focused understanding of how awareness of a felt sense is experienced as a move “inside of a person”. As researchers, educators, administrators, policy makers, and counsellors struggle with what works best with which populations and when, how best to allocate resources, how best to educate and support counsellors, and the complexity of doing research in real-life settings, this research has the potential to contribute to those varied dialogues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Humanities in Health Professions Education and Practice)
Open AccessArticle
The Meaning of Visual Thinking Strategies for Nursing Students
Humanities 2015, 4(4), 748-759; https://doi.org/10.3390/h4040748 - 30 Oct 2015
Cited by 8
Abstract
Nurse educators are called upon to provide innovative experiences for students to prepare them to work in complex healthcare settings. As part of this preparation, developing observational and communication skills is critical for nurses and can directly affect patient outcomes. Visual thinking strategies [...] Read more.
Nurse educators are called upon to provide innovative experiences for students to prepare them to work in complex healthcare settings. As part of this preparation, developing observational and communication skills is critical for nurses and can directly affect patient outcomes. Visual thinking strategies (VTS) is a teaching method that has been studied in primary education to develop communication and observational skills. VTS has potential to improve these same skills in nursing yet only one study has been done including nursing students and none have researched what meaning VTS has for them. This research study sought to answer the following questions: What meaning does VTS have for nursing students? How do nursing students use it in caring for patients? Students at a large Midwestern university in a Bachelor of Science program were recruited for participation. Students who voluntarily participated in a previous VTS experience were invited to participate in a second one, followed by an interview. Interpretive phenomenology was used to analyze the interviews and the following themes were identified: Feeling safe in learning and seeing and thinking differently. A literature review was performed to further expand these themes. Analysis of the findings and implications for future research are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Humanities in Health Professions Education and Practice)
Open AccessArticle
Interprofessional Learning as a Third Space: Rethinking Health Profession Students’ Development and Identity through the Concepts of Homi Bhabha
Humanities 2015, 4(4), 653-660; https://doi.org/10.3390/h4040653 - 16 Oct 2015
Abstract
Homi K. Bhabha is a post-colonial and cultural theorist who describes the emergence of new cultural forms from multiculturalism. When health profession students enculturated into their profession discuss patient care in an interprofessional group, their unilateral view is challenged. The students are in [...] Read more.
Homi K. Bhabha is a post-colonial and cultural theorist who describes the emergence of new cultural forms from multiculturalism. When health profession students enculturated into their profession discuss patient care in an interprofessional group, their unilateral view is challenged. The students are in that ambiguous area, or Third Space, where statements of their profession’s view of the patient enmesh and an interprofessional identity begins to form. The lessons learned from others ways of assessing and treating a patient, seen through the lens of hybridity allow for the development of a richer, interprofessional identity. This manuscript will seek out the ways Bhabha’s views of inbetweenness enhance understanding of the student’s development of an interprofessional viewpoint or identity, and deepen the author’s developing framework of an Interprofessional Community of Practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Humanities in Health Professions Education and Practice)
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