Feature Review Papers in Dermato

A special issue of Dermato (ISSN 2673-6179).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2022) | Viewed by 12243

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Dermatology and Venerolgy, Helios Klinikum Krefeld, Krefeld, Germany
2. Institute of Molecular Medicine, Medical School Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany
Interests: dermato-oncology; cutaneous lymphoma; malignant melanoma; dermatopathology; clinical trials; targeted therapies; autoimmune diseases
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Guest Editor
1. Skin Cancer Center, Department of Dermatology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany
2. Department of Dermatology, Christian Hospital Unna, Unna, Germany
Interests: skin cancers; cutaneous melanoma; Merkel cell carcinoma; cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma
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Guest Editor
Institut de Recherche Saint-Louis, Paris, France
Interests: tumor immunology; immunotherapy; cutaneous T cell lymphoma; breast cancer microenvironment; innate immunity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

To celebrate the successful launch of the journal Dermato, we are devoting this Special Issue to publishing a selection of review papers contributed by Editorial Board Members (EBMs) and authors invited by the Editorial Office. The Special Issue will highlight a diverse set of topics related to skin research, including broad aspects of dermatology, skin biology, skin development and aging, regenerative medicine, and stem cell research related to skin, plastic, reconstructive, and aesthetic surgery, etc.

We are welcoming experts from all over the world to contribute to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Chalid Assaf
Prof. Dr. Thilo Gambichler
Dr. Armand Bensussan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dermato is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dermatology
  • dermatopathology
  • skin cancers
  • sunscreen and skin aging
  • skin biology
  • plastic surgery
  • cosmetic dermatology
  • autoimmune diseases
  • inflammation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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26 pages, 1268 KiB  
Review
Merkel Cell Carcinoma in Kidney Transplant Recipients
by Henry H. L. Wu, Isobel Pye and Rajkumar Chinnadurai
Dermato 2023, 3(1), 25-50; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermato3010003 - 30 Jan 2023
Viewed by 2797
Abstract
Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an uncommon form of skin neoplasm with poor histological differentiation and an aggressive disease process, leading to high recurrence and mortality. There are multiple risk factors in which being in an immunocompromised state is a significant factor, and [...] Read more.
Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an uncommon form of skin neoplasm with poor histological differentiation and an aggressive disease process, leading to high recurrence and mortality. There are multiple risk factors in which being in an immunocompromised state is a significant factor, and the discovery of Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) since 2008 has strengthened causal associations between MCC and immunosuppression. Individuals who have undergone kidney transplantation are therefore more susceptible to having MCC, secondary to post-transplant immunosuppression which plays a vital role in reducing the risk of transplant kidney rejection. Over recent years a rise in the incidence of MCC following kidney transplantation is noted, with increased reporting of such cases. Whilst localized MCC is observed, MCC metastasis to the lymphatic system, brain, bone, liver, lung, and heart has been previously observed in patients with transplanted kidneys. Kidney metastasis is less common and has been only reported in recent years with greater frequency. The management of aggressive, metastatic MCC has historically been palliative, and prognosis is poor. Recently, the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors for metastatic MCC in multi-center phase II clinical trials have shown promising survival outcomes and have been approved for use in countries such as the United States as a first-line treatment. In this review we will explore the potential pathophysiological processes of MCC manifesting post-kidney transplantation. We will then evaluate the epidemiology of MCC within the context of kidney transplantation, before discussing the various clinical presentations, diagnostic measures, surveillance strategies, and current treatment options as well as future directions to best manage MCC in kidney transplant recipients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Review Papers in Dermato)
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14 pages, 1222 KiB  
Review
Recent Trends in the Integrated Management of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma
by Piyu Parth Naik
Dermato 2022, 2(3), 59-72; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermato2030007 - 28 Jun 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3100
Abstract
Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is one of the most prevalent neoplasms worldwide. Important risk factors for cSCC include sun exposure, immunosuppression, pale skin, and aging. White people are more likely to develop cSCC, and men are more affected than women. In advanced [...] Read more.
Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is one of the most prevalent neoplasms worldwide. Important risk factors for cSCC include sun exposure, immunosuppression, pale skin, and aging. White people are more likely to develop cSCC, and men are more affected than women. In advanced cases, surgery and/or radiotherapy are no longer effective. Due to a historical lack of treatment options, some medications have been used in these patients without sufficient recommendation. There is an urgent need to identify patients at an increased risk of recurrence and spread early for timely diagnosis and treatment. Despite extensive data on the high-risk features and prognostication, considerable variation remains globally regarding high-risk cSCC and the delivery of oncology services. The current comprehensive review evaluated and summarized contemporary knowledge of various management options for cSCC to simplify the integrated treatment plans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Review Papers in Dermato)
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6 pages, 657 KiB  
Case Report
First Onset of Pityriasis Rubra Pilaris following SARS-CoV-2 Booster Vaccination: Case Report and Review of the Literature
by Thilo Gambichler, Christina H. Scheel, Yousef Arafat, Ekaterina Heinzer, Kathrin Noldes, Zenaida Bulic and Stefanie Boms
Dermato 2022, 2(3), 73-78; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermato2030008 - 7 Jul 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 5623
Abstract
There is increasing evidence of adverse events associated with the use of COVID-19 vaccines. Here, we report a case of the SARS-CoV-2-vaccination-related onset of pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP) and provide an analysis of previously reported cases in the medical literature. A 67-year-old male [...] Read more.
There is increasing evidence of adverse events associated with the use of COVID-19 vaccines. Here, we report a case of the SARS-CoV-2-vaccination-related onset of pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP) and provide an analysis of previously reported cases in the medical literature. A 67-year-old male presented with a 1-year history of histopathologically proven PRP that first developed 14 days after receiving a COVID-19 booster vaccination. Skin symptoms improved under ustekinumab medication after unsuccessful previous treatment approaches using systemic corticosteroids, brodalumab, and risankizumab. Among the published cases of post-COVID vaccination PRP, 12 (75%) males and 4 (25%) females were reported. The median age of the reported patients was 59 years. In 10 out of 16 patients (62.5%), PRP was diagnosed after the first vaccine dose, in 4 (25%) after the second dose, and in 2 of 15 patients (12.5%) after the third dose. The median time between COVID-19 vaccination and the onset of PRP was 9.5 days (range: 3–60 days). The majority of patients required systemic treatment, including systemic retinoids and methotrexate. PRP might be a rare adverse event after COVID-19 vaccination, particularly affecting older males. Even though most reported patients with COVID-19-vaccination-related PRP could be successfully treated with PRP standard medications, therapy refractory cases may also occur. Thus, clinicians must be aware of this rare but potentially severe complication. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Review Papers in Dermato)
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