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Hygiene Behaviors and SARS-CoV-2-Preventive Behaviors in the Face of the COVID-19 Pandemic: Self-Reported Compliance and Associations with Fear, SARS-CoV-2 Risk, and Mental Health in a General Population vs. a Psychosomatic Patients Sample in Germany

1
Department of Psychology & Methods, Jacobs University Bremen, 28759 Bremen, Germany
2
Becker Klinikgruppe, 50968 Köln, Germany
3
Klinikum Wolfsburg, 38440 Wolfsburg, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Hygiene 2022, 2(1), 28-43; https://doi.org/10.3390/hygiene2010003
Received: 31 August 2021 / Revised: 27 December 2021 / Accepted: 28 December 2021 / Published: 6 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Section Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Prevention and Control)
Background: During the COVID-19 pandemic, hygiene behaviors such as keeping distance, avoiding masses, wearing face masks, and complying with hand hygiene recommendations became imperative. The current study aims to determine factors interrelating with hygiene behaviors. Methods: A total of 4049 individuals (1305 male, 2709 female, aged 18–80 years) were recruited from rehabilitation clinics or freely on the internet. They were surveyed via online questionnaires between May 2020 and August 2021. Sociodemographics, hygiene behaviors, and fear of COVID-19 infection were assessed. Results: Overall prevalence for hygiene behaviors was: keeping a distance—88.1%; avoiding mass gatherings—88.0%; wearing face masks—96.9%; and hand hygiene—81.6%, with 70% of the study participants complying with all four researched behaviors. Hygiene behaviors were significantly related to fear in a linear and quadratic fashion. Conclusion: Patients are more compliant according to their self-reported responses than the general population. To improve hygiene behavior, hand hygiene in particular provides options for improvements. A medium level of fear seems to be more functional than too-elevated fear. Behavioral interventions and targeted communication aiming at improving different behaviors in orchestration can help individuals to protect their health and to remain healthy. Accordingly, communication is required to ensure high hygiene standards and patient safety, and to prevent adverse effects. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; medical rehabilitation; psychosomatic patients; general public; infection; physical health; psychological health COVID-19; medical rehabilitation; psychosomatic patients; general public; infection; physical health; psychological health
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lippke, S.; Keller, F.M.; Derksen, C.; Kötting, L.; Dahmen, A. Hygiene Behaviors and SARS-CoV-2-Preventive Behaviors in the Face of the COVID-19 Pandemic: Self-Reported Compliance and Associations with Fear, SARS-CoV-2 Risk, and Mental Health in a General Population vs. a Psychosomatic Patients Sample in Germany. Hygiene 2022, 2, 28-43. https://doi.org/10.3390/hygiene2010003

AMA Style

Lippke S, Keller FM, Derksen C, Kötting L, Dahmen A. Hygiene Behaviors and SARS-CoV-2-Preventive Behaviors in the Face of the COVID-19 Pandemic: Self-Reported Compliance and Associations with Fear, SARS-CoV-2 Risk, and Mental Health in a General Population vs. a Psychosomatic Patients Sample in Germany. Hygiene. 2022; 2(1):28-43. https://doi.org/10.3390/hygiene2010003

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lippke, Sonia, Franziska M. Keller, Christina Derksen, Lukas Kötting, and Alina Dahmen. 2022. "Hygiene Behaviors and SARS-CoV-2-Preventive Behaviors in the Face of the COVID-19 Pandemic: Self-Reported Compliance and Associations with Fear, SARS-CoV-2 Risk, and Mental Health in a General Population vs. a Psychosomatic Patients Sample in Germany" Hygiene 2, no. 1: 28-43. https://doi.org/10.3390/hygiene2010003

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