Next Article in Journal
Hemostatic Dressings Made of Oxidized Bacterial Nanocellulose Membranes
Next Article in Special Issue
Conversion of Electrospun Chitosan into Chitin: A Robust Strategy to Tune the Properties of 2D Biomimetic Nanofiber Scaffolds
Previous Article in Journal
Bioremediation Potential of Streptomyces sp. MOE6 for Toxic Metals and Oil
Open AccessReview

Didymo and Its Polysaccharide Stalks: Beneficial to the Environment or Not?

1
Centre for Climate Change Research, Toronto, ON M4P 1J4, Canada
2
A.R. Environmental Solutions, ICUBE-University of Toronto Mississauga, Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6, Canada
3
Institute of Electronic and Sensor Materials, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, 09599 Freiberg, Germany
4
Center for Advanced Technology, Adam Mickiewicz University, 61614 Poznan, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Polysaccharides 2021, 2(1), 69-79; https://doi.org/10.3390/polysaccharides2010005
Received: 19 December 2020 / Revised: 30 January 2021 / Accepted: 3 February 2021 / Published: 17 February 2021
Didymosphenia geminata diatoms, or Didymo, was first found to be an invasive species that could have negative impacts on the environment due to the aggressive growth of its polysaccharide-based stalks. The stalks’ adhesive properties have prompted park officials to alert the general public to limit further spread and contamination of this algae to other bodies of water. Although the negative effects of Didymo have been studied in the past, recent studies have demonstrated a potential positive side to this alga. One of the potential benefits includes the structural component of the polysaccharide stalks. The origin of the polysaccharides within stalks remains unknown; however, they can be useful in a waste management and agricultural setting. The primary purpose of this study was to describe both the harmful and beneficial nature of Didymo. Important outcomes include findings related to its application in various fields such as medicine and technology. These polysaccharides can be isolated and studied closely to produce efficient solar power cells and batteries. Though they may be harmful while uncontained in nature, they appear to be very useful in the technological and medical advancement of our society. View Full-Text
Keywords: polysaccharides; biomineralization; chitin; algae; diatom; didymo; biosilica; biopolymers; environment polysaccharides; biomineralization; chitin; algae; diatom; didymo; biosilica; biopolymers; environment
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Ejaz, H.; Somanader, E.; Dave, U.; Ehrlich, H.; Rahman, M.A. Didymo and Its Polysaccharide Stalks: Beneficial to the Environment or Not? Polysaccharides 2021, 2, 69-79. https://doi.org/10.3390/polysaccharides2010005

AMA Style

Ejaz H, Somanader E, Dave U, Ehrlich H, Rahman MA. Didymo and Its Polysaccharide Stalks: Beneficial to the Environment or Not? Polysaccharides. 2021; 2(1):69-79. https://doi.org/10.3390/polysaccharides2010005

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ejaz, Hurmat; Somanader, Esther; Dave, Uday; Ehrlich, Hermann; Rahman, M. A. 2021. "Didymo and Its Polysaccharide Stalks: Beneficial to the Environment or Not?" Polysaccharides 2, no. 1: 69-79. https://doi.org/10.3390/polysaccharides2010005

Find Other Styles

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop