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Article

Rapid Urbanization and Infrastructure Pressure: Comparing the Sustainability Transition Potential of Water and Energy Regimes in Namibia

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Faculty of Technology, Satakunta University of Applied Sciences, 26100 Rauma, Finland
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Department of Sustainability Science, Lappeenranta-Lahti University of Technology, 15210 Lahti, Finland
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Department of Management Studies, Aalto University, 00076 Helsinki, Finland
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Faculty of Engineering, Namibia University of Science and Technology, Windhoek 13388, Namibia
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North-West University, Unit for Environmental Science and Management, Potchefstroom 2520, South Africa
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Faculty of Logistics and Maritime Technology, Satakunta University of Applied Sciences, 26100 Rauma, Finland
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Faculty of Technology, Satakunta University of Applied Sciences, 28100 Pori, Finland
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Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Namibia, Windhoek 13301, Namibia
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
World 2020, 1(2), 49-66; https://doi.org/10.3390/world1020006
Received: 28 May 2020 / Revised: 22 June 2020 / Accepted: 1 July 2020 / Published: 3 July 2020
This article presents a comparative study of the urban water and energy sectors in the coastal city of Walvis Bay in Namibia, where the rapid urbanization places pressure on public infrastructure development. A multidata approach is used to study the ability of the energy and water sectors to adapt to this pressure. Theoretically, the analysis is guided by the systems transition framework. A comparison between the two regimes is made on four dimensions: (1) regime dynamics, (2) level of complexity, (3) level of coordination, and (4) multiplicity of perceptions. The energy regime was found to be more capable of transitioning towards more sustainable practices due to better outcomes in multi-stakeholder engagement, a higher level of transparency, and differing landscape and niche development. The energy regime is also more open for new service providers. The water regime, on the other hand, suffers from overlapping roles and practices as well as non-existent monitoring authorities, which together negatively affect the regime’s transition potential. Both regimes suffer from lack of funding and weak institutional capacities. In conclusion, the transition potential of the studied regimes is found to increase when cross-sectoral governance is strengthened. View Full-Text
Keywords: energy; multi-level perspective; Namibia; urban development; water energy; multi-level perspective; Namibia; urban development; water
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MDPI and ACS Style

Savela, N.; Levänen, J.; Lindeman, S.; Kgabi, N.; Koivisto, H.; Olenius, M.; John, S.; Mashauri, D.; Keinänen-Toivola, M.M. Rapid Urbanization and Infrastructure Pressure: Comparing the Sustainability Transition Potential of Water and Energy Regimes in Namibia. World 2020, 1, 49-66. https://doi.org/10.3390/world1020006

AMA Style

Savela N, Levänen J, Lindeman S, Kgabi N, Koivisto H, Olenius M, John S, Mashauri D, Keinänen-Toivola MM. Rapid Urbanization and Infrastructure Pressure: Comparing the Sustainability Transition Potential of Water and Energy Regimes in Namibia. World. 2020; 1(2):49-66. https://doi.org/10.3390/world1020006

Chicago/Turabian Style

Savela, Nina, Jarkko Levänen, Sara Lindeman, Nnenesi Kgabi, Heikki Koivisto, Meri Olenius, Samuel John, Damas Mashauri, and Minna M. Keinänen-Toivola 2020. "Rapid Urbanization and Infrastructure Pressure: Comparing the Sustainability Transition Potential of Water and Energy Regimes in Namibia" World 1, no. 2: 49-66. https://doi.org/10.3390/world1020006

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