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Sleep Timing in Patients with Precocious and Delayed Pubertal Development

1
Institute for Experimental Pediatric Endocrinology, Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, 13353 Berlin, Germany
2
Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
3
Institute of Medical Psychology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, 80336 Munich, Germany
4
Endokrinologikum, 10117 Berlin, Germany
5
Child Development Center, University Children’s Hospital Zurich, 8050 Zurich, Switzerland
6
Center for Chronic Sick Children (SPZ), Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Corporate Member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, 13353 Berlin, Germany
7
Department for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Corporate Member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, 13353 Berlin, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Clocks & Sleep 2019, 1(1), 140-150; https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep1010013
Received: 20 December 2018 / Revised: 8 February 2019 / Accepted: 13 February 2019 / Published: 16 February 2019
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Abstract

Previous studies have reported a shift in the timing of sleep during adolescence toward a later time. To date, it is unclear whether hormonal changes during puberty might contribute to this change in sleeping behavior. We systematically assessed pubertal development and sleep timing in a cross-sectional case-control study in girls with precocious (n = 42) and boys with delayed pubertal development (n = 19). We used the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire and the Children’s ChronoType Questionnaire to assess sleep timing in patients and age- and sex-matched controls (n = 309) and used the midpoint of sleep on free days, corrected for potential sleep debt accumulated during the school week, as a marker for sleep timing. Compared to the controls, girls with central precocious puberty showed a delay in sleep timing of 54 min, and girls with premature pubarche slept on average 30 min later. Male adolescents with delayed pubertal development showed an average sleep midpoint that was 40 min earlier compared to the control group. The results of this pilot study suggest an association between pubertal onset and shifts in sleep timing, which is a novel finding in human sleep behavior. Prospective studies in larger cohorts will be needed to examine the robustness and generalizability of the findings. View Full-Text
Keywords: chronotype; puberty; circadian clock; sleep; adolescence chronotype; puberty; circadian clock; sleep; adolescence
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Jessen, E.; Vetter, C.; Roenneberg, T.; Liesenkötter, K.-P.; Werner, H.; Jenni, O.G.; Lankes, E.; Blankenstein, O.; Neumann, U.; Köhler, B.; Wiegand, S.; Krude, H.; Kühnen, P. Sleep Timing in Patients with Precocious and Delayed Pubertal Development. Clocks & Sleep 2019, 1, 140-150.

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