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Open AccessArticle

Nitrogen Mineralization and Microbial Biomass Dynamics in Different Tropical Soils Amended with Contrasting Organic Resources

1
United Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Saiwaicho 3-5-8, Fuchu, Tokyo183-8509, Japan
2
Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research, Eberswalder Str. 84, 15374 Müencheberg, Germany
3
Faculty of Life Science, Institute of Agriculture and Horticulture, Humboldt-University of Berlin, Albrecht-Thaer-Weg 5, 14195 Berlin, Germany
4
Institute of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Saiwaicho 3-5-8, Fuchu, Tokyo183-8509, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Soil Syst. 2018, 2(4), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/soilsystems2040063
Received: 21 September 2018 / Revised: 15 November 2018 / Accepted: 20 November 2018 / Published: 23 November 2018
The use of location-specific and underutilized organic residues (OR) as soil amendments in small-holder agro-ecosystems is promising. Six ORs (Leucaena leucocephala, Centrosema pubescens, Gliricidia sepium, Pueraria phaseoloides, Azadirachta indica, and Theobroma cacao) were amended to three tropical soils each at 24 mg g−1 dry soil in 120-day incubation study to estimate their nitrogen (N) mineralization and microbial biomass carbon (C) dynamics. Inorganic N contents varied among ORs, soil type and incubation days. Regardless of soil type, Gliricidia had the highest inorganic N among the studied ORs. Mineralization rate of 1.4 to 1.5 mg N kg−1 soil day−1 was observed for Lego and Tec soils, respectively, and was twice higher than Nya soil. However, Nya soil released higher inorganic N than Tec and Lego soils, implying high N mineralization efficiency in the former. Consistent soil pH increase was respectively observed for Theobroma and Pueraria treatments in all soils. Moreover, Theobroma and Pueraria amendments showed the highest soil microbial biomass C (MBC) at the end of the incubation. The assessed soil properties likely affected by the dominant edaphic factors and management influenced differences in MBC and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) while OR quality indices controlled N mineralization. Thus, we conclude that soil properties and OR type are important factors for optimal utilization of organic resources. View Full-Text
Keywords: organic residues; microbial biomass; organic carbon; nitrogen mineralization; agro-ecological zone organic residues; microbial biomass; organic carbon; nitrogen mineralization; agro-ecological zone
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ansong Omari, R.; Bellingrath-Kimura, D.S.; Fujii, Y.; Sarkodee-Addo, E.; Appiah Sarpong, K.; Oikawa, Y. Nitrogen Mineralization and Microbial Biomass Dynamics in Different Tropical Soils Amended with Contrasting Organic Resources. Soil Syst. 2018, 2, 63.

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