Next Article in Journal
Formation of the Azodication (ABTS2+) from ABTS [2,2′-Azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonate)] in Sterile Plant Cultures: Root–Exuded Oxidoreductases Contribute to Rhizosphere Priming
Next Article in Special Issue
Substrate Influences Temperature Sensitivity of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) and Nitrogen (DON) Mineralization in Arid Agricultural Soils
Previous Article in Journal
The Impact of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Husbandry on the Biophysical Characteristics of Soils in Neotropical Agroecosystems
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Composition and Stability of Clay-Associated Organic Matter along a Soil Profile
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Soil Syst. 2018, 2(2), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/soilsystems2020025

Soil Organic Carbon Changes for Switchgrass Farms in East Tennessee, USA

1
170 Winfair Drive, Tyrone, GA 30290, USA
2
Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-4518, USA
3
Biosystems Engineering and Soil Science, University of Tennessee, Jackson, TN 38301, USA
4
Biosystems Engineering and Soil Science, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-4531, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 7 March 2018 / Revised: 17 April 2018 / Accepted: 17 April 2018 / Published: 24 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil Organic Matter Dynamics)
Full-Text   |   PDF [2541 KB, uploaded 10 May 2018]   |  

Abstract

Much attention has been paid to switchgrass’s potential for conversion to cellulosic ethanol and its ability to sequester soil organic carbon (SOC). Soil samples from switchgrass farms in East Tennessee were collected at depths of 0–5, 15–30, 30–60, and 60–90 cm and tested for SOC over a 4-year period (2008–2011). Results showed no differences (p ≥ 0.05) in SOC from 2008 to 2011. However, when comparing the initial samples to year four, SOC decreases ranging from 0.04 to 0.47 t ha−1 were observed in the 5–10 and 10–15 cm soil depths. While SOC increased with time in the 90 to 120 cm layer, this increase was not significant at p = 0.05 but was significant at the 0.10 level. Following three full growing seasons, switchgrass’s potential to sequester carbon comes at deeper soil depths due to its vast root structure. Greater levels of carbon were present in soil previously no-tilled compared to that previously under conventional tillage; however, neither gained or lost a significant amount of SOC by year four. Alfisols were the only taxonomic category that had a significant increase in SOC by year four. Green beans were the only previously produced crop that had a significant positive effect on sequestering carbon. Increases in switchgrass yield were correlated to SOC. View Full-Text
Keywords: soil carbon; carbon sequestration; soil testing; switchgrass; cellulosic feedstock; renewables; Tennessee soil carbon; carbon sequestration; soil testing; switchgrass; cellulosic feedstock; renewables; Tennessee
Figures

Graphical abstract

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Toliver, D.K.; English, B.C.; Tyler, D.D.; Lee, J.; Menard, R.J.; Walton, J.C. Soil Organic Carbon Changes for Switchgrass Farms in East Tennessee, USA. Soil Syst. 2018, 2, 25.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Soil Syst. EISSN 2571-8789 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top