Next Article in Journal
Hotspot Analysis of Structure Fires in Urban Agglomeration: A Case of Nagpur City, India
Next Article in Special Issue
Transcending Parallel Play: Boundary Spanning for Collective Action in Wildfire Management
Previous Article in Journal
Non-Destructive Fuel Volume Measurements Can Estimate Fine-Scale Biomass across Surface Fuel Types in a Frequently Burned Ecosystem
Previous Article in Special Issue
Prescribed Burns in California: A Historical Case Study of the Integration of Scientific Research and Policy
Article

Facilitating Prescribed Fire in Northern California through Indigenous Governance and Interagency Partnerships

1
Department of Anthropology, Geography and Environmental Studies, California State University, East Bay, 25800 Meiklejohn Hall 4036, Hayward, CA 94542, USA
2
Karuk Tribe, Department of Natural Resources, P.O. Box 282, Orleans, CA 95556, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Amanda Stasiewicz
Received: 1 July 2021 / Accepted: 10 July 2021 / Published: 16 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Collection Rethinking Wildland Fire Governance: A Series of Perspectives)
Prescribed burning by Indigenous people was once ubiquitous throughout California. Settler colonialism brought immense investments in fire suppression by the United States Forest Service and the California Department of Forestry and Fire Prevention (CAL FIRE) to protect timber and structures, effectively limiting prescribed burning in California. Despite this, fire-dependent American Indian communities such as the Karuk and Yurok peoples, stalwartly advocate for expanding prescribed burning as a part of their efforts to revitalize their culture and sovereignty. To examine the political ecology of prescribed burning in Northern California, we coupled participant observation of prescribed burning in Karuk and Yurok territories (2015–2019) with 75 surveys and 18 interviews with Indigenous and non-Indigenous fire managers to identify political structures and material conditions that facilitate and constrain prescribed fire expansion. Managers report that interagency partnerships have provided supplemental funding and personnel to enable burning, and that decentralized prescribed burn associations facilitate prescribed fire. However, land dispossession and centralized state regulations undermine Indigenous and local fire governance. Excessive investment in suppression and the underfunding of prescribed fire produces a scarcity of personnel to implement and plan burns. Where Tribes and local communities have established burning infrastructure, authorities should consider the devolution of decision-making and land repatriation to accelerate prescribed fire expansion. View Full-Text
Keywords: prescribed fire; fire governance; fire suppression; Indigenous peoples; American Indians; settler colonialism; tribal sovereignty; California prescribed fire; fire governance; fire suppression; Indigenous peoples; American Indians; settler colonialism; tribal sovereignty; California
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Marks-Block, T.; Tripp, W. Facilitating Prescribed Fire in Northern California through Indigenous Governance and Interagency Partnerships. Fire 2021, 4, 37. https://doi.org/10.3390/fire4030037

AMA Style

Marks-Block T, Tripp W. Facilitating Prescribed Fire in Northern California through Indigenous Governance and Interagency Partnerships. Fire. 2021; 4(3):37. https://doi.org/10.3390/fire4030037

Chicago/Turabian Style

Marks-Block, Tony, and William Tripp. 2021. "Facilitating Prescribed Fire in Northern California through Indigenous Governance and Interagency Partnerships" Fire 4, no. 3: 37. https://doi.org/10.3390/fire4030037

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop