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Open AccessArticle

Polymeric Composites Based on Carboxymethyl Cellulose Cryogel and Conductive Polymers: Synthesis and Characterization

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Department of Chemistry & Nanoscience and Technology Research and Application Center, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University Terzioglu Campus, Canakkale 17100, Turkey
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Department of Chemistry, Hacettepe University, Beytepe, Ankara 06800, Turkey
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Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620, USA
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Department of Ophthalmology, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Blvd, MDC21, Tampa, FL 33612, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Compos. Sci. 2020, 4(2), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcs4020033
Received: 7 March 2020 / Revised: 23 March 2020 / Accepted: 27 March 2020 / Published: 29 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Conductive Polymer Composites)
In this study, a super porous polymeric network prepared from a natural polymer, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), was used as a scaffold in the preparation of conductive polymers such as poly(Aniline) (PANi), poly(Pyrrole) (PPy), and poly(Thiophene) (PTh). CMC–conductive polymer composites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques, and conductivity measurements. The highest conductivity was observed as 4.36 × 10−4 ± 4.63 × 10−5 S·cm−1 for CMC–PANi cryogel composite. The changes in conductivity of prepared CMC cryogel and its corresponding PAN, PPy, and PTh composites were tested against HCl and NH3 vapor. The changes in conductivity values of CMC cryogel upon HCl and NH3 vapor treatment were found to increase 1.5- and 2-fold, respectively, whereas CMC–PANi composites showed a 143-fold increase in conductivity upon HCl and a 12-fold decrease in conductivity upon NH3 treatment, suggesting the use of natural polymer–conductive polymer composites as sensor for these gases. View Full-Text
Keywords: CMC cryogel; natural polymer–conductive polymer cryogel composite; carboxymethyl cellulose cryogel composites; conductive natural polymer cryogel CMC cryogel; natural polymer–conductive polymer cryogel composite; carboxymethyl cellulose cryogel composites; conductive natural polymer cryogel
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MDPI and ACS Style

Demirci, S.; Sutekin, S.D.; Sahiner, N. Polymeric Composites Based on Carboxymethyl Cellulose Cryogel and Conductive Polymers: Synthesis and Characterization. J. Compos. Sci. 2020, 4, 33.

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