Next Issue
Volume 3, December
Previous Issue
Volume 3, June
 
 

J. Otorhinolaryngol. Hear. Balance Med., Volume 3, Issue 3 (September 2022) – 1 article

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Reader to open them.
Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
15 pages, 1140 KiB  
Review
A Narrative Review of Auditory Categorisation and Its Potential Role in Tinnitus Perception
by Dunja Vajsakovic, Michael R. D. Maslin and Grant D. Searchfield
J. Otorhinolaryngol. Hear. Balance Med. 2022, 3(3), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/ohbm3030006 - 29 Jul 2022
Viewed by 2318
Abstract
Auditory categorisation is a phenomenon reflecting the non-linear nature of human perceptual spaces which govern sound perception. Categorisation training paradigms may reduce sensitivity toward training stimuli, decreasing the representation of these stimuli in auditory perceptual maps. Reduced cortical representation may have clinical implications [...] Read more.
Auditory categorisation is a phenomenon reflecting the non-linear nature of human perceptual spaces which govern sound perception. Categorisation training paradigms may reduce sensitivity toward training stimuli, decreasing the representation of these stimuli in auditory perceptual maps. Reduced cortical representation may have clinical implications for conditions that arise from disturbances in cortical activation, such as tinnitus. This review explores the categorisation of sound, with a particular focus on tinnitus. The potential of categorisation training as a sound-based tinnitus therapy is discussed. A narrative review methodological framework was followed. Four databases (PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, and ScienceDirect) were extensively searched for the following key words: categorisation, categorical perception, perceptual magnet effect, generalisation, and categorisation OR categorical perception OR perceptual magnet effect OR generalisation AND sound. Given the exploratory nature of the review and the fact that early works on categorisation are crucial to the understanding and development of auditory categorisation, all study types were selected for the period 1950–2022. Reference lists of articles were reviewed to identify any further relevant studies. The results of the review were catalogued and organised into themes. In total, 112 articles were reviewed in full, from which 59 were found to contain relevant information and were included in the review. Key themes identified included categorical perception of speech stimuli, warping of the auditory perceptual space, categorisation versus discrimination, the presence of categorisation across several modalities, and categorisation as an innate versus learned feature. Although a substantial amount of work focused on evaluating the effects of categorisation training on sound perception, only two studies investigated the effects of categorisation training on tinnitus. Implementation of a categorisation-based perceptual training paradigm could serve as a promising means of tinnitus management by reversing the changes in cortical plasticity that are seen in tinnitus, in turn altering the representation of sound within the auditory cortex itself. In the instance that the categorisation training is successful, this would likely mean a decrease in the level of activity within the auditory cortex (and other associated cortical areas found to be hyperactive in tinnitus) as well as a reduction in tinnitus salience. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Previous Issue
Next Issue
Back to TopTop