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Evaluating Temperature Control in Friction Stir Welding for Industrial Applications

1
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, USA
2
Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Konda Gokuldoss Prashanth
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2021, 5(4), 124; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp5040124
Received: 22 October 2021 / Revised: 12 November 2021 / Accepted: 12 November 2021 / Published: 19 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Joining Processes and Techniques)
Reports in the literature indicate that temperature control in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) enables better weld properties and easier weld process development. However, although methods of temperature control have existed for almost two decades, industry adoption remains limited. This work examines single-loop Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) control on spindle speed as a comparatively simple and cost-effective method of adding temperature control to existing FSW machines. Implementation of PID-based temperature control compared to uncontrolled FSW in AA6111 at linear weld speeds of 1–2 m per minute showed improved mechanical properties and greater consistency in properties along the length of the weld under temperature control. Additionally, results indicate that a minimum spindle rpm may exist, above which tensile specimens do not fracture within the weld centerline, regardless of temperature. This work demonstrates that a straightforward, PID-based implementation of temperature control at high weld rates can produce high quality welds. View Full-Text
Keywords: friction stir welding; temperature control; PID control; high feedrate friction stir welding; temperature control; PID control; high feedrate
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wright, A.; Munro, T.R.; Hovanski, Y. Evaluating Temperature Control in Friction Stir Welding for Industrial Applications. J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2021, 5, 124. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp5040124

AMA Style

Wright A, Munro TR, Hovanski Y. Evaluating Temperature Control in Friction Stir Welding for Industrial Applications. Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing. 2021; 5(4):124. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp5040124

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wright, Arnold, Troy R. Munro, and Yuri Hovanski. 2021. "Evaluating Temperature Control in Friction Stir Welding for Industrial Applications" Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing 5, no. 4: 124. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp5040124

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