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Modeling the Expenditure and Recovery of Anaerobic Work Capacity in Cycling

1
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634, USA
2
Department of Health Sciences, Furman University, Greenville, SC 29613, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Presented at the 12th conference of the International Sports Engineering Association, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, 26–29 March 2018.
Proceedings 2018, 2(6), 219; https://doi.org/10.3390/proceedings2060219
Published: 23 February 2018
The objective of this research is to model the expenditure and recovery of Anaerobic Work Capacity (AWC) as related to Critical Power (CP) during cycling. CP is a theoretical value at which a human can operate indefinitely and AWC is the energy that can be expended above CP. There are several models to predict AWC-depletion, however, only a few to model AWC recovery. A cycling study was conducted with nine recreationally active subjects. CP and AWC were determined by a 3-min all-out test. The subjects performed interval tests at three recovery intervals (15 s, 30 s, or 60 s) and three recovery powers (0.50CP, 0.75CP, and CP). It was determined that the rate of expenditure exceeds recovery and the amount of AWC recovered is influenced more by recovery power level than recovery duration. Moreover, recovery rate varies by individual and thus, a robust mathematical model for expenditure and recovery of AWC is needed.
Keywords: intermittent cycling; cycling fatigue; Critical Power; Anaerobic Work Capacity; expenditure and recovery of AWC intermittent cycling; cycling fatigue; Critical Power; Anaerobic Work Capacity; expenditure and recovery of AWC
MDPI and ACS Style

Bickford, P.; Sreedhara, V.S.M.; Mocko, G.M.; Vahidi, A.; Hutchison, R.E. Modeling the Expenditure and Recovery of Anaerobic Work Capacity in Cycling. Proceedings 2018, 2, 219.

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