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Article

Improved Detection of Intestinal Helminth Infections with a Formalin Ethyl-Acetate-Based Concentration Technique Compared to a Crude Formalin Concentration Technique

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Shoklo Malaria Research Unit, Mahidol–Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, P.O. Box 46, 68/30 Bann Thung Road, Mae Sot 63100, Thailand
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Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel, Switzerland
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University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel, Switzerland
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Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LG, UK
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Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Department of Helminthology, Mahidol University, 420/6 Ratchawithi Road, Ratchathewi, Bangkok 10400, Thailand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: John Frean
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2021, 6(2), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed6020051
Received: 26 March 2021 / Revised: 12 April 2021 / Accepted: 13 April 2021 / Published: 15 April 2021
Intestinal helminth infections are the most prevalent neglected tropical diseases, predominantly affecting rural and marginalised populations. The mainstay of diagnosis is the microscopic examination of faecal samples to detect parasites in the form of eggs, larvae and cysts. In an effort to improve the standard of care, the comparative accuracy in detecting helminth infections of the hitherto used formalin-based concentration method (FC) was compared to a previously developed formalin ethyl-acetate-based concentration technique (FECT), prior to the systematic deployment of the latter at a research and humanitarian unit operating on the Thailand–Myanmar border. A total of 693 faecal samples were available for the comparison of the two diagnostic methods. The FECT was superior in detecting hookworm, Trichuris trichiura and small liver flukes. Interestingly, there was no significant difference for Ascaris lumbricoides, possibly due to the high observed egg density. Despite the minor increase in material cost and the fact that the FECT is somewhat more time consuming, this method was implemented as the new routine technique. View Full-Text
Keywords: diagnosis; formalin ethyl-acetate concentration technique; small liver flukes; soil-transmitted helminths; stool concentration technique diagnosis; formalin ethyl-acetate concentration technique; small liver flukes; soil-transmitted helminths; stool concentration technique
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MDPI and ACS Style

Brummaier, T.; Archasuksan, L.; Watthanakulpanich, D.; Paris, D.H.; Utzinger, J.; McGready, R.; Proux, S.; Nosten, F. Improved Detection of Intestinal Helminth Infections with a Formalin Ethyl-Acetate-Based Concentration Technique Compared to a Crude Formalin Concentration Technique. Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2021, 6, 51. https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed6020051

AMA Style

Brummaier T, Archasuksan L, Watthanakulpanich D, Paris DH, Utzinger J, McGready R, Proux S, Nosten F. Improved Detection of Intestinal Helminth Infections with a Formalin Ethyl-Acetate-Based Concentration Technique Compared to a Crude Formalin Concentration Technique. Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease. 2021; 6(2):51. https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed6020051

Chicago/Turabian Style

Brummaier, Tobias; Archasuksan, Laypaw; Watthanakulpanich, Dorn; Paris, Daniel H.; Utzinger, Jürg; McGready, Rose; Proux, Stephane; Nosten, François. 2021. "Improved Detection of Intestinal Helminth Infections with a Formalin Ethyl-Acetate-Based Concentration Technique Compared to a Crude Formalin Concentration Technique" Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 6, no. 2: 51. https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed6020051

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