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Communication

Factors Influencing HIV Drug Resistance among Pregnant Women in Luanda, Angola: Findings from a Cross-Sectional Study

by 1,2,3, 1,2,4 and 1,5,*
1
Centro de Investigação em Saúde de Angola, Caxito, Angola
2
Molecular Biology Laboratory, Instituto Nacional de Investigação em Saúde, Luanda, Angola
3
Instituto Superior de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Agostinho Neto, Luanda, Angola
4
Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Agostinho Neto, Luanda, Angola
5
Health and Technology Research Center, Escola Superior de Tecnologia da Saúde de Lisboa, Instituto Politécnico de Lisboa, 1990-096 Lisboa, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2021, 6(1), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed6010029
Received: 4 February 2021 / Revised: 26 February 2021 / Accepted: 2 March 2021 / Published: 5 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue HIV and Co-Infections: Old and New Challenges)
The increase in HIV infection and drug-resistant strains is an important public health concern, especially in resource-limited settings. However, the identification of factors related to the propagation of infectious diseases represents a crucial target offering an opportunity to reduce health care costs as well as deepening the focus on preventing infection in high-risk groups. In this study, we investigate the factors related to drug resistance among HIV-infected pregnant women in Luanda, the capital city of Angola. This was a part of a cross-sectional study conducted with 42 HIV-positive pregnant women. A blood sample was collected, and HIV-1 genotyping was carried out using an in-house method. Multivariate analyses were performed to determine the interaction between sociodemographic characteristics and drug resistance. HIV drug resistance was detected in 44.1% of the studied population. High probabilities of drug resistance were observed for HIV-infected pregnant women living in rural areas (AOR: 2.73; 95% CI: 0.50–14.9) with high educational level (AOR: 6.27; 95% CI: 0.77–51.2) and comorbidities (AOR: 5.47; 95% CI: 0.28–106) and infected with a HIV-1 non-B subtype other than subtype C (AOR: 1.60; 95% CI: 0.25–10.3). The present study reports high HIV drug resistance. Furthermore, older-age, rural areas, high educational levels, unemployed status, having comorbidities, and HIV-1 subtypes were factors related to drug resistance. These factors impact on drug susceptibility and need to be urgently addressed in order to promote health education campaigns able to prevent the spread of drug-resistant HIV strains in Angola. View Full-Text
Keywords: HIV infection; antiretroviral failure; risk factors; pregnant women; Angola HIV infection; antiretroviral failure; risk factors; pregnant women; Angola
MDPI and ACS Style

Sebastião, C.S.; Morais, J.; Brito, M. Factors Influencing HIV Drug Resistance among Pregnant Women in Luanda, Angola: Findings from a Cross-Sectional Study. Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2021, 6, 29. https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed6010029

AMA Style

Sebastião CS, Morais J, Brito M. Factors Influencing HIV Drug Resistance among Pregnant Women in Luanda, Angola: Findings from a Cross-Sectional Study. Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease. 2021; 6(1):29. https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed6010029

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sebastião, Cruz S., Joana Morais, and Miguel Brito. 2021. "Factors Influencing HIV Drug Resistance among Pregnant Women in Luanda, Angola: Findings from a Cross-Sectional Study" Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease 6, no. 1: 29. https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed6010029

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