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Open AccessArticle

Influence of Adaptive Human–Machine Interface on Electric-Vehicle Range-Anxiety Mitigation

1
Valeo-Comfort And Driving Assistance-InnoCoRe, 93000 Bobigny, France
2
af83, 75002 Paris, France
3
Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), 700 13 Crete, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Multimodal Technol. Interact. 2020, 4(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti4010004
Received: 17 December 2019 / Revised: 5 February 2020 / Accepted: 10 February 2020 / Published: 14 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Understanding UX through Implicit and Explicit Feedback)
The electrification of vehicles is without a doubt one of the milestones of today’s automotive technology. Even though industry actors perceive it as a future standard, acceptance, and adoption of this kind of vehicles by the end user remain a huge challenge. One of the main issues is the range anxiety related to the electric vehicle’s remaining battery level. In the scope of the H2020 ADAS&ME project, we designed and developed an intelligent Human Machine Interface (HMI) to ease acceptance of Electric Vehicle (EV) technology. This HMI is mounted on a fake autonomous vehicle piloted by a hidden joystick (called Wizard of Oz (WoZ) driving). We examined 22 inexperienced EV drivers during a one-hour driving task tailored to generate range anxiety. According to our protocol, once the remaining battery level started to become critical after manual driving, the HMI proposed accurate coping techniques to inform the drivers how to reduce the power consumption of the vehicle. In the following steps of the protocol, the vehicle was totally out of battery, and the drivers had to experience an emergency stop. The first result of this paper was that an intelligent HMI could reduce the range anxiety of the driver by proposing adapted coping strategies (i.e., transmitting how to save energy when the vehicle approaches a traffic light). The second result was that such an HMI and automated driving to a safe spot could reduce the stress of the driver when an emergency stop is necessary. View Full-Text
Keywords: range anxiety mitigation; human factors; driver acceptance; electric vehicle; human–machine cooperation; human–machine interfaces; user experience; Wizard of Oz autonomous driving range anxiety mitigation; human factors; driver acceptance; electric vehicle; human–machine cooperation; human–machine interfaces; user experience; Wizard of Oz autonomous driving
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MDPI and ACS Style

Musabini, A.; Nguyen, K.; Rouyer, R.; Lilis, Y. Influence of Adaptive Human–Machine Interface on Electric-Vehicle Range-Anxiety Mitigation. Multimodal Technol. Interact. 2020, 4, 4. https://doi.org/10.3390/mti4010004

AMA Style

Musabini A, Nguyen K, Rouyer R, Lilis Y. Influence of Adaptive Human–Machine Interface on Electric-Vehicle Range-Anxiety Mitigation. Multimodal Technologies and Interaction. 2020; 4(1):4. https://doi.org/10.3390/mti4010004

Chicago/Turabian Style

Musabini, Antonyo; Nguyen, Kevin; Rouyer, Romain; Lilis, Yannis. 2020. "Influence of Adaptive Human–Machine Interface on Electric-Vehicle Range-Anxiety Mitigation" Multimodal Technol. Interact. 4, no. 1: 4. https://doi.org/10.3390/mti4010004

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