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Open AccessCase Report

Increased Short-Term Fluctuation in Optic Nerve Head Blood Flow in a Case of Normal-Tension Glaucoma by the Use of Laser Speckle Flowgraphy

Nakano Eye Clinic of Kyoto Medical Co-Operative, Kyoto 604-8404, Japan
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Academic Editor: Iok-Hou Pang
Received: 22 August 2016 / Revised: 1 September 2016 / Accepted: 2 September 2016 / Published: 8 September 2016
An 80-year-old woman with normal-tension glaucoma was transferred to our clinic 9 years ago. She exhibited progressive visual field defect despite intraocular pressure in both eyes remaining stable in the low teens after treatment with prostaglandin-derivative eye drops. Increased short-term fluctuation in optic nerve head (ONH) blood flow was detected using laser speckle flowgraphy. After the patient was administered kallidinogenase tablets, the fluctuation was reduced and her visual field defect was ameliorated. However, the fluctuation increased and the visual field defect deteriorated after the patient discontinued the medication. The increased short-term fluctuation in ONH blood flow seemed to be associated with the development of glaucomatous visual field defect in this case. View Full-Text
Keywords: normal-tension glaucoma; optic nerve head blood flow; short-term fluctuation; kallidinogenase normal-tension glaucoma; optic nerve head blood flow; short-term fluctuation; kallidinogenase
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sugiyama, T.; Nakamura, H. Increased Short-Term Fluctuation in Optic Nerve Head Blood Flow in a Case of Normal-Tension Glaucoma by the Use of Laser Speckle Flowgraphy. Vision 2017, 1, 5.

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