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Open AccessArticle

Short-Term Effects of Suspension Training on Strength and Power Performances

1
Department of Human Sciences, Society and Health, University of Cassino and Lazio Meridionale, 03043 Cassino, Italy
2
Department of Sports Science and Kinesiology, University of Salzburg, 5400 Salzburg, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2018, 3(4), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk3040051
Received: 29 August 2018 / Revised: 27 September 2018 / Accepted: 18 October 2018 / Published: 23 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resistance Training for Performance and Health)
Suspension Training (ST) workouts include a variety of movements requiring the individual to maintain balance while performing various resistance exercises in an interval fashion. Although ST is thought to elicit higher muscle activations than traditional exercises, only limited information is available on its acute effects on strength and power performances, especially in relation to gender. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the strength and power acute responses after ST, also in relation to gender. Eighty-eight (46 males, 42 females) participants were administered countermovement jumps (CMJ), squat jumps (SJ), lower limb Maximum Voluntary Contraction (MVC) at 90° angle knee extension, and grip strength (handgrip) before (PRE) and after (POST) a 50 min ST session involving upper, lower body and core exercises. ANOVA for repeated measures was used to evaluate the differences (p < 0.05) in relation to gender and experimental session. After ST session, significantly higher values emerged in males, whereas no significant changes were found in females. Findings indicate that ST as a form of exercise is useful to maintain and improve acute strength and power performances, especially in male participants. Future studies should be carried out to explore the gender-related differences in response to acute bout of ST exercises. View Full-Text
Keywords: instability; jump; maximum voluntary contraction; handgrip instability; jump; maximum voluntary contraction; handgrip
MDPI and ACS Style

Giancotti, G.F.; Fusco, A.; Iannaccone, A.; Cortis, C. Short-Term Effects of Suspension Training on Strength and Power Performances. J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2018, 3, 51.

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