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Article

Agency, Responsibility, Selves, and the Mechanical Mind

1
Faculty of Philosophy, Philosophy of Science and Religious Studies, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, 80539 Munich, Germany
2
Institute of Law, Politics, and Development, Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies, 56127 Pisa, Italy
Philosophies 2021, 6(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies6010007
Received: 14 December 2020 / Revised: 5 January 2021 / Accepted: 10 January 2021 / Published: 19 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Enhancement Technologies and Our Merger with Machines)
Moral issues arise not only when neural technology directly influences and affects people’s lives, but also when the impact of its interventions indirectly conceptualizes the mind in new, and unexpected ways. It is the case that theories of consciousness, theories of subjectivity, and third person perspective on the brain provide rival perspectives addressing the mind. Through a review of these three main approaches to the mind, and particularly as applied to an “extended mind”, the paper identifies a major area of transformation in philosophy of action, which is understood in terms of additional epistemic devices—including a legal perspective of regulating the human–machine interaction and a personality theory of the symbiotic connection between human and machine. I argue this is a new area of concern within philosophy, which will be characterized in terms of self-objectification, which becomes “alienation” following Ernst Kapp’s philosophy of technology. The paper argues that intervening in the brain can affect how we conceptualize the mind and modify its predicaments. View Full-Text
Keywords: brain–computer interface (BCI); human–robot interaction; mind; sense of agency; alienation brain–computer interface (BCI); human–robot interaction; mind; sense of agency; alienation
MDPI and ACS Style

Battaglia, F. Agency, Responsibility, Selves, and the Mechanical Mind. Philosophies 2021, 6, 7. https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies6010007

AMA Style

Battaglia F. Agency, Responsibility, Selves, and the Mechanical Mind. Philosophies. 2021; 6(1):7. https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies6010007

Chicago/Turabian Style

Battaglia, Fiorella. 2021. "Agency, Responsibility, Selves, and the Mechanical Mind" Philosophies 6, no. 1: 7. https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies6010007

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