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Int. J. Neonatal Screen. 2017, 3(4), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijns3040028

Critical Congenital Heart Disease Screening Using Pulse Oximetry: Achieving a National Approach to Screening, Education and Implementation in the United States

Children’s National Heart Institute, Washington, DC 20010-2970, USA
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Received: 19 September 2017 / Revised: 10 October 2017 / Accepted: 10 October 2017 / Published: 19 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neonatal Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Defects)
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Abstract

A national approach to screening for critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) using pulse oximetry was undertaken in the United States. Following the scientific studies that laid the groundwork for the addition of CCHD screening to the U.S. Recommended Uniform Screening Panel (RUSP) and endorsement by professional societies, advocates including physicians, nurses, parents, medical associations, and newborn screening interest groups were able to successfully pass laws requiring the screen on a state by state basis. Public health involvement and screening requirements vary by state. However, a common algorithm, education, and implementation strategies were shared nationally as well as CCHD toolkits to aid in the implementation in hospitals. Health Resources & Services Administration (HRSA) grants to pilot states encouraged the development of a public health infrastructure around screening, data collection, and quality measures. The formation of a CCHD NewSTEPs technical advisory work group provided a systematic way to tackle challenges and share best practices by hosting monthly meetings and webinars. CCHD screening is now required in 48 states, with over 98% of U.S. births being screened for CCHD using pulse oximetry. A standard protocol has been implemented in most states. While the challenges related to screening special populations and quantifying screening outcomes through the creation of a national data repository remain; universal implementation is nearly complete. View Full-Text
Keywords: CCHD screening in the US; newborn screening pulse oximetry; critical congenital heart disease screening CCHD screening in the US; newborn screening pulse oximetry; critical congenital heart disease screening
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Wandler, L.A.; Martin, G.R. Critical Congenital Heart Disease Screening Using Pulse Oximetry: Achieving a National Approach to Screening, Education and Implementation in the United States. Int. J. Neonatal Screen. 2017, 3, 28.

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