Next Article in Journal
Biogenic Metal Oxides
Previous Article in Journal
Metal Oxide Nanoparticles as Biomedical Materials
Open AccessReview

Lotus Effect and Friction: Does Nonsticky Mean Slippery?

Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 3200 N Cramer St, Milwaukee, WI 53211, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Biomimetics 2020, 5(2), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics5020028
Received: 3 March 2020 / Revised: 10 June 2020 / Accepted: 11 June 2020 / Published: 12 June 2020
Lotus-effect-based superhydrophobicity is one of the most celebrated applications of biomimetics in materials science. Due to a combination of controlled surface roughness (surface patterns) and low-surface energy coatings, superhydrophobic surfaces repel water and, to some extent, other liquids. However, many applications require surfaces which are water-repellent but provide high friction. An example would be highway or runway pavements, which should support high wheel–pavement traction. Despite a common perception that making a surface non-wet also makes it slippery, the correlation between non-wetting and low friction is not always direct. This is because friction and wetting involve many mechanisms and because adhesion cannot be characterized by a single factor. We review relevant adhesion mechanisms and parameters (the interfacial energy, contact angle, contact angle hysteresis, and specific fracture energy) and discuss the complex interrelation between friction and wetting, which is crucial for the design of biomimetic functional surfaces. View Full-Text
Keywords: wetting; friction; adhesion; biomimetic surfaces wetting; friction; adhesion; biomimetic surfaces
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Hasan, M.S.; Nosonovsky, M. Lotus Effect and Friction: Does Nonsticky Mean Slippery? Biomimetics 2020, 5, 28.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop