Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Racial Illiteracies and Whiteness: Exploring Black Mixed-Race Narrations of Race in the Family
Previous Article in Journal
States of Intimacy: Refugee Parents, Anxiety, and the Spectral State in Denmark
Previous Article in Special Issue
#Wasian Check: Remixing ‘Asian + White’ Multiraciality on TikTok
 
 
Article

Regimes beyond the One-Drop Rule: New Models of Multiracial Identity

1
Department of Sociology, Graduate School of Arts & Science, New York University, New York, NY 10012, USA
2
Department of Sociology, School of Humanities and Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
3
Inequality in America Initiative, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Dan Rodriguez-Garcia
Genealogy 2022, 6(2), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy6020057
Received: 15 February 2022 / Revised: 3 May 2022 / Accepted: 7 June 2022 / Published: 20 June 2022
The racial classification of mixed-race people has often been presumed to follow hypo- or hyperdescent rules, where they were assigned to either their lower- or higher-status monoracial ancestor group. This simple framework, however, does not capture actual patterns of self-identification in contemporary societies with multiple racialized groups and numerous mixed-race combinations. Elaborating on previous concepts of multiracial classification regimes, we argue that two other theoretical models must be incorporated to describe and understand mixed-race identification today. One is “co-descent”, where multiracial individuals need not align with one single race or another, but rather be identified with or demonstrate characteristics that are a blend of their parental or ancestral races. The other is the “dominance” framework, a modern extension of the “one-drop” notion that posits that monoracial ancestries fall along a spectrum where some—the “supercessive”—are more likely to dominate mixed-race categorization, and others—the “recessive”—are likely to be dominated. Drawing on the Pew Research Center’s 2015 Survey of Multiracial Adults, we find declining evidence of hypo- and hyperdescent at work in the United States today, some support for a dominance structure that upends conventional expectations about a Black one-drop rule, and a rising regime of co-descent. In addition, we explore how regimes of mixed-race classification vary by racial ancestry combination, gender, generation of multiraciality, and the time period in which multiracial respondents or their mixed-race ancestors were born. These findings show that younger, first-generation multiracial Americans, especially those of partial Asian or Hispanic descent, have left hypo- and hyperdescent regimes behind—unlike other young people today whose mixed-race ancestry stems from further back in their family tree. View Full-Text
Keywords: multiracial; classification; identity; hypodescent; hyperdescent multiracial; classification; identity; hypodescent; hyperdescent
MDPI and ACS Style

Iverson, S.; Morning, A.; Saperstein, A.; Xu, J. Regimes beyond the One-Drop Rule: New Models of Multiracial Identity. Genealogy 2022, 6, 57. https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy6020057

AMA Style

Iverson S, Morning A, Saperstein A, Xu J. Regimes beyond the One-Drop Rule: New Models of Multiracial Identity. Genealogy. 2022; 6(2):57. https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy6020057

Chicago/Turabian Style

Iverson, Sarah, Ann Morning, Aliya Saperstein, and Janet Xu. 2022. "Regimes beyond the One-Drop Rule: New Models of Multiracial Identity" Genealogy 6, no. 2: 57. https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy6020057

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop