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Decolonizing Ways of Knowing: Heritage, Living Communities, and Indigenous Understandings of Place
Open AccessEditorial

Sankofa Time

1
Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida (USF), Tampa, FL 33620, USA
2
USF Heritage Research Lab, Tampa, FL 33620, USA
Genealogy 2020, 4(4), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4040105
Received: 5 August 2020 / Revised: 21 September 2020 / Accepted: 10 October 2020 / Published: 22 October 2020
Amongst the Akan people of Ghana, the word “Sankofa” can be broken down into three syllables— “san” (return), “ko” (go), and “fa” (take)—that can be translated into “go back and take it,” or more philosophically, go back to learn. It is often represented by the Andinkra symbol of a bird with its feet facing forward and its head tucked behind; an apt metaphor for the practice of genealogical research. In Black communities in the United States, it is often evoked in attempts to reflect upon and engage with an African past. View Full-Text
Keywords: African diaspora; slavery; plantation spaces; rice agriculture; enslaved Africans; descendant communities African diaspora; slavery; plantation spaces; rice agriculture; enslaved Africans; descendant communities
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Jackson, A.T. Sankofa Time. Genealogy 2020, 4, 105.

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