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Article

“My Daddy … He Was a Good Man”: Gendered Genealogies and Memories of Enslaved Fatherhood in America’s Antebellum South

School of History, Classics and Archaeology, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE1 7RU, UK
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Genealogy 2020, 4(2), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4020043
Received: 18 February 2020 / Revised: 23 March 2020 / Accepted: 24 March 2020 / Published: 1 April 2020
While the last few years have witnessed an upsurge of studies into enslaved motherhood in the antebellum American South, the role of the enslaved father remains largely trapped within a paradigm of enforced absenteeism from an unstable and insecure familial unit. The origins of this lie in the racist assumptions of the infamous “Moynihan Report” of 1965, read backwards into slavery itself. Consequently, the historiographical trajectory of work on enslaved men has drawn out the performative aspects of their masculinity in almost every area of their lives except that of fatherhood. This has produced an image of individualistic masculinity, separate from the familial role that many enslaved men managed to sustain and, as a result, productive of a disjointed and gendered genealogy of slavery and its legacy. This paper assesses the extent to which this fractured genealogy actually represents the former slaves’ worldview. By examining a selection of interviews conducted by the Federal Writers’ Project under the auspices of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) in the 1930s (the WPA Narratives), this paper explores formers slaves’ memories of their enslaved fathers and the significance of the voluntary paternal presence in their life stories. It concludes that the role of the black father was of greater significance than so far recognised by the genealogical narratives that emerged from the slave communities of the Antebellum South. View Full-Text
Keywords: Slavery; Fathers; American South; Memory; WPA Narratives Slavery; Fathers; American South; Memory; WPA Narratives
MDPI and ACS Style

Grant, S.-M.; Bowe, D. “My Daddy … He Was a Good Man”: Gendered Genealogies and Memories of Enslaved Fatherhood in America’s Antebellum South. Genealogy 2020, 4, 43. https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4020043

AMA Style

Grant S-M, Bowe D. “My Daddy … He Was a Good Man”: Gendered Genealogies and Memories of Enslaved Fatherhood in America’s Antebellum South. Genealogy. 2020; 4(2):43. https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4020043

Chicago/Turabian Style

Grant, Susan-Mary, and David Bowe. 2020. "“My Daddy … He Was a Good Man”: Gendered Genealogies and Memories of Enslaved Fatherhood in America’s Antebellum South" Genealogy 4, no. 2: 43. https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4020043

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