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Indigenous Reflections on Identity, Trauma, and Healing: Navigating Belonging and Power

College of Education, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
Genealogy 2019, 3(2), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy3020026
Received: 11 April 2019 / Revised: 16 May 2019 / Accepted: 19 May 2019 / Published: 25 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intergenerational Trauma and Healing)
Indigenous people are survivors of what some scholars have called the nexus of bio–psycho–social–cultural–spiritual intergenerational trauma. The effects of these multi-plex traumas brought on by European colonialism(s) reverberate into the present and affect Indigenous peoples at various scales, from local interpersonal relations to larger macro scales of geo-regional displacement. Indigenous peoples, however, have also survived the traumas of displacement, genocide, racism, surveillance, and incarceration by sustaining systems of ancestral and contemporary healing practices that contribute to individual and collective survivance. In this essay, I explore intergenerational rememberings of Indigenous identity, trauma, and healing based on personal, family, and community memory. Through rememberings, I seek to deconstruct the Western constructs of identity and trauma, arguing that these conceptions create trappings based on the exclusions of membership that support power hierarchies that perpetuate the dehumanization of Native peoples. By exposing these trappings, I will engage in my own decolonizing healing process by reclaiming, reconnecting, rewriting and rerighting histories. Finally, through an I/We Indigenous philosophy of belonging, I will argue that emotion can be an important saber (knowing) to help understand Indigenous identities as connected, collective, and ancestral ways of knowing and being that re/humanize Indigenous collective relational understandings. View Full-Text
Keywords: survivance; sobrevivencia; healing; struggle; trauma; mothers; movements survivance; sobrevivencia; healing; struggle; trauma; mothers; movements
MDPI and ACS Style

Urrieta, L., Jr. Indigenous Reflections on Identity, Trauma, and Healing: Navigating Belonging and Power. Genealogy 2019, 3, 26.

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