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Foucault’s Darwinian Genealogy

Political Philosophy, University of Florence and Deutsches Institut Florenz, Via dei Pecori 1, 50123 Florence, Italy
Academic Editor: Philip Kretsedemas
Genealogy 2017, 1(2), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy1020009
Received: 10 March 2017 / Revised: 24 April 2017 / Accepted: 16 May 2017 / Published: 23 May 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue What is Genealogy?)
This paper outlines Darwin’s theory of descent with modification in order to show that it is genealogical in a narrow sense, and that from this point of view, it can be understood as one of the basic models and sources—also indirectly via Nietzsche—of Foucault’s conception of genealogy. Therefore, this essay aims to overcome the impression of a strong opposition to Darwin that arises from Foucault’s critique of the “evolutionistic” research of “origin”—understood as Ursprung and not as Entstehung. By highlighting Darwin’s interpretation of the principles of extinction, divergence of character, and of the many complex contingencies and slight modifications in the becoming of species, this essay shows how his genealogical framework demonstrates an affinity, even if only partially, with Foucault’s genealogy. View Full-Text
Keywords: Darwin; Foucault; genealogy; natural genealogies; teleology; evolution; extinction; origin; Entstehung; rudimentary organs Darwin; Foucault; genealogy; natural genealogies; teleology; evolution; extinction; origin; Entstehung; rudimentary organs
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Solinas, M. Foucault’s Darwinian Genealogy. Genealogy 2017, 1, 9.

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