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Open AccessArticle

Yield and Fruit Properties of Husk Tomato (Physalis phyladelphica) Cultivars Grown in the Open Field in the South of West Siberia

1
Institute of Soil Science and Agrochemistry SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia
2
Central Siberian Botanical Garden SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Horticulturae 2019, 5(1), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae5010019
Received: 23 December 2018 / Revised: 12 January 2019 / Accepted: 7 February 2019 / Published: 18 February 2019
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Abstract

Husk tomato (Physalis philadelphica Lam.) a source of functional food and medicinal compounds, has attracted renewed interest for production in temperate zones. Field-grown husk tomato yield and fruit properties and their relationship with soil chemistry and temperature were studied in the south of West Siberia, Russia, at five experimental sites. At each site, a microplot experiment with two cultivars was conducted. Basic soil chemical properties and fruit pH and dry matter, total carbon, nitrogen, and ascorbic acid content were determined. Both cultivars grew and yielded very well, producing on average 70 fruits, or 1.46 kg, per plant, with 14 mg ascorbic acid per 100 g fresh weight, 9.0% dry matter, and juice pH of 4.1. Variation in environmental conditions among sites was the major factor determining production and fruit property variation, with cultivar biology accounting for 10%. The cultivars responded differently to some soil properties, but generally their yield and fruit quality depended on soil pH and labile phosphorous and potassium. Thus, husk tomato has remarkable capacity for vigorous yields in unprotected conditions in West Siberia, despite air and soil temperatures that are much lower than in its region of origin. Detailed studies are needed to elucidate its response to varying solar radiation and atmospheric precipitation. View Full-Text
Keywords: husk tomato; Physalis philadelphica Lam.; soil chemical properties; fruit quality; ascorbic acid; open field experiment; West Siberia; North Asia husk tomato; Physalis philadelphica Lam.; soil chemical properties; fruit quality; ascorbic acid; open field experiment; West Siberia; North Asia
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Naumova, N.; Nechaeva, T.; Savenkov, O.; Fotev, Y. Yield and Fruit Properties of Husk Tomato (Physalis phyladelphica) Cultivars Grown in the Open Field in the South of West Siberia. Horticulturae 2019, 5, 19.

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