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Evidence-Based Role of Nutrients and Antioxidants for Chronic Pain Management in Musculoskeletal Frailty and Sarcopenia in Aging

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Department of Biology, College of Science, University of Bahrain, Sakhir Campus, Zallaq P.O. Box 32038, Kingdom of Bahrain
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CRIAMS-Sport Medicine Centre, 27058 Voghera, Italy
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Department of Movement and Wellbeing Sciences, University of Naples “Parthenope”, 80133 Naples, Italy
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Endocrinology and Nutrition Unit, Azienda di Servizi alla Persona ‘‘Istituto Santa Margherita’’, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
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Department of Internal Medicine and Therapeutics, Section of Geriatrics, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
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Azienda di Servizi alla Persona, Istituto di Cura Santa Margherita of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
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Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
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IRCCS Mondino Foundation, 27100 Pavia, Italy
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Geriatrics 2020, 5(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics5010016
Received: 16 December 2019 / Revised: 14 February 2020 / Accepted: 28 February 2020 / Published: 6 March 2020
Musculoskeletal disorders in aging and pain are closely connected because of multiple mechanisms leading to loss of mobility and autonomy. Pain is predictive of diability and worsening frailty and the strength of this relationship increases with the severity of pain. This study presents a systematic review of randomized controlled trials, cross sectional studies, and observational studies based on treatment of pain in adults with musculoskeletal disorders using nutritional non-pharmacological (nutrients and antioxidants) interventions. The review found the efficiency of the following topics: (a) accession of the patient to a dietary counselling (e.g., daily recommended amount of protein—equivalent to at least of 1 g of protein per kilogram of body weight); (b) intake of glutamic acid-rich such as soy, egg, and cod and tryptophan-rich foods such as milk and peanuts—or taking quick-acting, free-form supplements; (c) supplementation of vitamin D and magnesium, if lacking; (d) weekly consumption of fish or supplements of omega-3 fatty acids; and (e) availability of botanicals, in particular curcumin and gingerol. These non-pharmacological interventions can help the pain therapist to create a personalized medicine (precision medicine), acting with the maximum efficacy and safety, and also reducing the dosage of analgesic drugs needed. View Full-Text
Keywords: persistent pain; elderly; sarcopenia; antioxidants; nutrition persistent pain; elderly; sarcopenia; antioxidants; nutrition
MDPI and ACS Style

Perna, S.; Alalwan, T.A.; Al-Thawadi, S.; Negro, M.; Parimbelli, M.; Cerullo, G.; Gasparri, C.; Guerriero, F.; Infantino, V.; Diana, M.; D’Antona, G.; Rondanelli, M. Evidence-Based Role of Nutrients and Antioxidants for Chronic Pain Management in Musculoskeletal Frailty and Sarcopenia in Aging. Geriatrics 2020, 5, 16.

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