Next Article in Journal
Establishment and Characterization of New Canine and Feline Osteosarcoma Primary Cell Lines
Previous Article in Journal
Comparative Aspects of Canine Melanoma
Previous Article in Special Issue
Atlantic Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) as A Sentinel for Exposure to Mercury in Humans: Closing the Loop
Open AccessReview

Sentinel Animals in a One Health Approach to Harmful Cyanobacterial and Algal Blooms

1
National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway NE, MS F-60, Chamblee, GA 30341, USA
2
Office of Spill Prevention and Response, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Marine Wildlife Veterinary Care and Research Center, 1451 Shaffer Rd, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
3
School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Peter M. Rabinowitz and Lisa A. Conti
Vet. Sci. 2016, 3(2), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci3020008
Received: 3 February 2016 / Revised: 8 April 2016 / Accepted: 14 April 2016 / Published: 21 April 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Sentinels for Diseases and Environmental Pollution)
People, domestic animals, and wildlife are all exposed to numerous environmental threats, including harmful algal blooms (HABs). However, because animals exhibit wide variations in diet, land use and biology, they are often more frequently or heavily exposed to HAB toxins than are people occupying the same habitat, making them sentinels for human exposures. Historically, we have taken advantage of unique physiological characteristics of animals, such as the sensitivity of canaries to carbon monoxide, to more quickly recognize threats and help protect human health. As HAB events become more severe and widespread worldwide, exposure and health outcome data for animals can be extremely helpful to predict, prevent, and evaluate human exposures and health outcomes. Applying a One Health approach to investigation of HABs means that lessons learned from animal sentinels can be applied to protect people, animals and our shared environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: algae; biotoxin; cyanobacteria; cyanotoxin; domoic acid; freshwater; harmful algal bloom; marine water; one health; saxitoxin; sentinel algae; biotoxin; cyanobacteria; cyanotoxin; domoic acid; freshwater; harmful algal bloom; marine water; one health; saxitoxin; sentinel
MDPI and ACS Style

Backer, L.C.; Miller, M. Sentinel Animals in a One Health Approach to Harmful Cyanobacterial and Algal Blooms. Vet. Sci. 2016, 3, 8.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop