Next Article in Journal
Drivers of Acceptance of a New Beverage in Europe
Previous Article in Journal
Water Quality in Selected Small Drinking Water Systems of Missouri Rural Communities
Article

Scotch Whisky: History, Heritage and the Stock Cycle

Independent Scholar, Worcester WR1 3DG, UK
Academic Editor: Edgar Chambers
Beverages 2016, 2(2), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages2020011
Received: 7 February 2016 / Revised: 12 April 2016 / Accepted: 20 April 2016 / Published: 26 April 2016
This article is concerned with one of the UK’s major export successes of the last century, Scotch whisky. The economics of the production process place considerable onus on firms to forecast demand for up to a decade ahead. History reveals the difficulty in achieving this, with clear cycles of over-production and under-production as firms attempt to adjust their stock portfolios. No sooner has leadership emerged to encourage a more strategic approach to the stock cycle than market forces encourage some firms to break ranks in pursuit of alternative objectives. With the industry having consolidated further following the large mergers of the late 1990s and 2000s, it is tempting to assume the vagaries of the past are over. Current record production and stock levels, however, are set to test this proposition as Scotch sales are now below the peak level of 2011. View Full-Text
Keywords: Scotch whisky; stock cycle; competition; cooperation Scotch whisky; stock cycle; competition; cooperation
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Bower, J. Scotch Whisky: History, Heritage and the Stock Cycle. Beverages 2016, 2, 11. https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages2020011

AMA Style

Bower J. Scotch Whisky: History, Heritage and the Stock Cycle. Beverages. 2016; 2(2):11. https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages2020011

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bower, Julie. 2016. "Scotch Whisky: History, Heritage and the Stock Cycle" Beverages 2, no. 2: 11. https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages2020011

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop