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Open AccessReview

3D Bioprinting Strategies for the Regeneration of Functional Tubular Tissues and Organs

by 1, 2, 2,3,4,5,* and 1,6,*
1
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Wonkwang University, 460, Iksan-daero, Iksan-si, Jeollabuk-do 54538, Korea
2
Department of Creative IT Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 77 Cheongam-Ro, Nam-Gu, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 37673, Korea
3
School of Interdisciplinary Bioscience and Bioengineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 77 Cheongam-Ro, Nam-Gu, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 37673, Korea
4
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 77 Cheongam-Ro, Nam-Gu, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 37673, Korea
5
Institute of Convergence Science, Yonsei University, 50, Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722, Korea
6
Department of Mechanical and Design Engineering, Wonkwang University, 460, Iksan-daero, Iksan-si, Jeollabuk-do 54538, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Bioengineering 2020, 7(2), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering7020032
Received: 29 February 2020 / Revised: 30 March 2020 / Accepted: 30 March 2020 / Published: 31 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocomposite Inks for 3D Printing)
It is difficult to fabricate tubular-shaped tissues and organs (e.g., trachea, blood vessel, and esophagus tissue) with traditional biofabrication techniques (e.g., electrospinning, cell-sheet engineering, and mold-casting) because these have complicated multiple processes. In addition, the tubular-shaped tissues and organs have their own design with target-specific mechanical and biological properties. Therefore, the customized geometrical and physiological environment is required as one of the most critical factors for functional tissue regeneration. 3D bioprinting technology has been receiving attention for the fabrication of patient-tailored and complex-shaped free-form architecture with high reproducibility and versatility. Printable biocomposite inks that can facilitate to build tissue constructs with polymeric frameworks and biochemical microenvironmental cues are also being actively developed for the reconstruction of functional tissue. In this review, we delineated the state-of-the-art of 3D bioprinting techniques specifically for tubular tissue and organ regeneration. In addition, this review described biocomposite inks, such as natural and synthetic polymers. Several described engineering approaches using 3D bioprinting techniques and biocomposite inks may offer beneficial characteristics for the physiological mimicry of human tubular tissues and organs. View Full-Text
Keywords: 3D bioprinting; biocomposite ink; tubular tissue; tubular organ 3D bioprinting; biocomposite ink; tubular tissue; tubular organ
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jeong, H.-J.; Nam, H.; Jang, J.; Lee, S.-J. 3D Bioprinting Strategies for the Regeneration of Functional Tubular Tissues and Organs. Bioengineering 2020, 7, 32. https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering7020032

AMA Style

Jeong H-J, Nam H, Jang J, Lee S-J. 3D Bioprinting Strategies for the Regeneration of Functional Tubular Tissues and Organs. Bioengineering. 2020; 7(2):32. https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering7020032

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jeong, Hun-Jin; Nam, Hyoryung; Jang, Jinah; Lee, Seung-Jae. 2020. "3D Bioprinting Strategies for the Regeneration of Functional Tubular Tissues and Organs" Bioengineering 7, no. 2: 32. https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering7020032

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