Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Association between Itch and Cancer in 3836 Pediatric Pruritus Patients at a Tertiary Care Center
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Diagnostic Workup and Evaluation of Patients with Prurigo Nodularis
Open AccessArticle

Racial and Gender Differences in the Presentation of Pruritus

1
Department of Dermatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA
2
School of Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA
3
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Medicines 2019, 6(4), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines6040098
Received: 27 June 2019 / Revised: 27 August 2019 / Accepted: 25 September 2019 / Published: 27 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pathogenesis and Treatment of Chronic Pruritus)
Background: Pruritus is a common disease symptom with a variety of etiologies known to reduce patient quality of life. We aimed to characterize the racial and gender differences in the presentation of pruritus for itch-related patient visits both within a single institution and nationally. Methods: Cross sectional study of patients ≥ 18 years old seen at Johns Hopkins Health System between 1/1/12 and 1/1/18. Results were compared to data from 2005–2011 from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) and the National Health Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS). Results: Our findings indicate that itch patients at JHHS (n = 18,753) were more likely to be black compared to white patients (37% vs. 19%, p < 0.01) when compared to patients without itch—a trend also noted nationally based on data from NAMCS/NHAMCS (26% vs. 21%, p = 0.05). Black itch patients are also more likely to be diagnosed with prurigo nodularis (OR 2.37, p < 0.0001), lichen planus (OR 1.22, p < 0.0001), and atopic dermatitis OR 1.51, p < 0.0001). Female itch patients are more likely to be diagnosed with autoimmune (OR 1.66, p < 0.0001) and psychiatric comorbidities (OR 1.2–1.8, p < 0.0001) than male itch patients. When compared to black itch patients nationally, white itch patients were more likely to visit a dermatologist (29% vs. 18%, p = 0.028). Our data can identify associated conditions and demographic differences but are unable to support a causal relationship. Conclusions: Black and female patients are more likely to present with pruritus, a symptom associated with comorbidities such as prurigo nodularis, lichen planus, atopic dermatitis, and psychiatric conditions. View Full-Text
Keywords: pruritus; itch; prurigo; nodularis; atopic; dermatitis; race; gender; comorbidities; demographics pruritus; itch; prurigo; nodularis; atopic; dermatitis; race; gender; comorbidities; demographics
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Whang, K.A.; Khanna, R.; Thomas, J.; Aguh, C.; Kwatra, S.G. Racial and Gender Differences in the Presentation of Pruritus. Medicines 2019, 6, 98.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop