Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Association between Itch and Cancer in 3836 Pediatric Pruritus Patients at a Tertiary Care Center
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Diagnostic Workup and Evaluation of Patients with Prurigo Nodularis
Article

Racial and Gender Differences in the Presentation of Pruritus

1
Department of Dermatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA
2
School of Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA
3
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Medicines 2019, 6(4), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines6040098
Received: 27 June 2019 / Revised: 27 August 2019 / Accepted: 25 September 2019 / Published: 27 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pathogenesis and Treatment of Chronic Pruritus)
Background: Pruritus is a common disease symptom with a variety of etiologies known to reduce patient quality of life. We aimed to characterize the racial and gender differences in the presentation of pruritus for itch-related patient visits both within a single institution and nationally. Methods: Cross sectional study of patients ≥ 18 years old seen at Johns Hopkins Health System between 1/1/12 and 1/1/18. Results were compared to data from 2005–2011 from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) and the National Health Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS). Results: Our findings indicate that itch patients at JHHS (n = 18,753) were more likely to be black compared to white patients (37% vs. 19%, p < 0.01) when compared to patients without itch—a trend also noted nationally based on data from NAMCS/NHAMCS (26% vs. 21%, p = 0.05). Black itch patients are also more likely to be diagnosed with prurigo nodularis (OR 2.37, p < 0.0001), lichen planus (OR 1.22, p < 0.0001), and atopic dermatitis OR 1.51, p < 0.0001). Female itch patients are more likely to be diagnosed with autoimmune (OR 1.66, p < 0.0001) and psychiatric comorbidities (OR 1.2–1.8, p < 0.0001) than male itch patients. When compared to black itch patients nationally, white itch patients were more likely to visit a dermatologist (29% vs. 18%, p = 0.028). Our data can identify associated conditions and demographic differences but are unable to support a causal relationship. Conclusions: Black and female patients are more likely to present with pruritus, a symptom associated with comorbidities such as prurigo nodularis, lichen planus, atopic dermatitis, and psychiatric conditions. View Full-Text
Keywords: pruritus; itch; prurigo; nodularis; atopic; dermatitis; race; gender; comorbidities; demographics pruritus; itch; prurigo; nodularis; atopic; dermatitis; race; gender; comorbidities; demographics
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Whang, K.A.; Khanna, R.; Thomas, J.; Aguh, C.; Kwatra, S.G. Racial and Gender Differences in the Presentation of Pruritus. Medicines 2019, 6, 98. https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines6040098

AMA Style

Whang KA, Khanna R, Thomas J, Aguh C, Kwatra SG. Racial and Gender Differences in the Presentation of Pruritus. Medicines. 2019; 6(4):98. https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines6040098

Chicago/Turabian Style

Whang, Katherine A., Raveena Khanna, Jamael Thomas, Crystal Aguh, and Shawn G. Kwatra 2019. "Racial and Gender Differences in the Presentation of Pruritus" Medicines 6, no. 4: 98. https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines6040098

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop